Cure Tuberculosis Project

Speeches Shim

•	Almost 700 TB patients received psychosocial support, food and hygiene packages, and/or financial assistance through civil society organizations and the engagement of local government and local communities to help people affected by TB.
• Almost 700 TB patients received psychosocial support, food and hygiene packages, and/or financial assistance through civil society organizations and the engagement of local government and local communities to help people affected by TB.
Olivier Leblanc

The USAID Cure Tuberculosis Project assists the Kyrgyz government to diagnose, treat, and cure people with drug-resistant tuberculosis. The project works to strengthen systems, tools, resources, and human capacity to improve the Kyrgyz Republic’s response to tuberculosis in line with international recommendations.

People at risk of tuberculosis (TB) are often among the hardest to reach, which can make it difficult for them to access health services. The Cure Tuberculosis Project works closely with the Kyrgyz government to ensure that TB services are both high-quality and accessible, even for the country’s most hard-to-reach citizens. As stigma and discrimination often prevent people from getting the services they need, the Cure Tuberculosis Project will work to reduce tuberculosis stigma and discrimination among health care providers and the general public. 

The Cure Tuberculosis Project focuses on strengthening systems, tools, resources, and human capacity to improve the Kyrgyz Republic’s TB response in compliance with the latest international recommendations. The project will also strengthen the Kyrgyz government’s efforts to design, manage, and monitor a system of high-quality TB services available at local health care facilities and to create conditions where healthcare services meet the needs of the people. 

The Cure Tuberculosis Project is implemented by JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc. (JSI) in partnership with University Research Co., LLC (URC), and close collaboration with the Kyrgyz Republic’s National Tuberculosis Program under the Ministry of Health and national partners. 

Duration: July 2019 – July 2024

Budget: $18,5 million 

Implementing Partner: JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc. (JSI) in partnership with the University Research Co., LLC (URC)

Key Partners: Ministry of Health of the Kyrgyz Republic, National Tuberculosis Program (NTP), Mandatory Health Insurance Fund (MHIF)

Activity Locations: Countrywide

MAJOR FOCUS AREAS

  1. Increase Drug-Resistant TB Case Detection. Strengthen laboratory and diagnostic services and expand detection and contact-tracing capabilities in communities and health facilities.
  2. Cure More Patients of Drug-Resistant TB. Ensure that all patients receive the correct treatment regimen with high-quality drugs and ensure all patients complete their treatment as directed.
  3. Prevent Drug-Resistant TB Infections. Improve infection control in health facilities and laboratories and improve patient, provider, and at-risk people’s behaviors around preventing, detecting, and treating TB. 
  4. Improve the Enabling Environment. Improve TB-related policies, optimize financing for TB services, enhance the use of TB data for decision-making, and reduce stigma and discrimination.

IMPACT AND RESULTS (2019-2021)

Increase drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) case detection. Strengthen laboratory and diagnostic services and expand case detection and contact investigation capabilities in communities and health facilities.

  • The project helped to improve the diagnosis of TB by restructuring the work of laboratories in Chui, Naryn, and Talas Oblasts. For example, improved procedures and a switch from paper to information technologies resulted in a drastic reduction in the turn-around time for tests that detect how well a particular strain of TB responds to different drugs – from up to 90 days to less than five.
  • USAID continues to support the implementation of digital solutions across the health care system in order to manage TB-related information more effectively. 103 health facilities across the country now have access to the online laboratory data system used to capture and share TB test results in real time. The system was also adapted for COVID-19 tests, which the Kyrgyz government recognized as a major contribution to the fight against the pandemic.
  • The project continues to support nationwide efforts to effectively detect TB cases. Four general hospitals in Chui Oblast implemented a special protocol to identify signs of TB among admitted patients and refer them for testing. The project expanded the contact investigation process in Chui Oblast to detect cases among those in contact with TB patients. This new contact investigation model was rolled out to Naryn and Batken Oblasts. In nine months since the implementation, the new processes resulted in the identification of 535 contacts and 23 confirmed TB cases.
  • Cure Tuberculosis trained almost 9,000 community leaders in target areas on TB-related issues. They conducted information campaigns to raise awareness of TB and reduce stigma and discrimination against patients, reaching 1.5 million people nationwide.

Cure more patients of drug-resistant TB. Ensure that all patients receive correct treatment regimens with high-quality drugs and ensure all patients complete their treatment as directed.

  • Cure Tuberculosis helped to develop clinical protocols, guidelines, and strategies related to drug management, infection control, and working with patients. For example, a number of strategies to support patient treatment remotely with rare visits to health care facilities were institutionalized by the Ministry of Health.
  • All TB hospitals and 81 primary health facilities keep electronic patient records in the medical information system developed by the project.
  • Almost 700 TB patients received psychosocial support, food and hygiene packages, and/or financial assistance through civil society organizations and the engagement of local government and local communities to help people affected by TB.

Prevent Drug-Resistant TB Infections. Improve infection prevention and control in health facilities and laboratories and improve patient, provider, and at-risk people’s behaviors around preventing, detecting, and treating TB.

  • Cure Tuberculosis assisted TB Centers in Talas, Naryn, and Batken in improving their infection control measures. More than 90 specialists completed training on prevention of transmission in clinical settings.
  • The project is working to help change the behavior of patients and their communities to encourage testing, treatment, and support of TB patients. As part of these efforts, the project developed 16 videos showcasing stories of patients, their families, and communities. These videos are demonstrated to target audiences through project partners and sub-grantees in mass media and social media.

Improve the Enabling Environment. Improve TB-related policies, optimize financing for TB services, enhance the use of TB data for decision-making, and reduce stigma and discrimination.

  • Cure Tuberculosis is working with the government to improve TB treatment and prevention policies including some financial arrangements. The project helped to adopt 21 different regulatory documents, reform TB services in four oblasts, and develop the National Program Tuberculosis-VI for 2022-2026 (pending approval). Since 2019, the project worked with the state Mandatory Health Insurance Fund (MHIF) to develop financing mechanisms for different aspects of TB treatment such as the transportation of sputum samples to labs. These financing methods have been institutionalized and secured through the MHIF budget law.
  • The project provided technical support to the Republican Health Promotion Center to develop an annual work plan on social and behavior change to coordinate the dissemination of harmonized information on TB and efforts to reduce stigma and discrimination through the National Tuberculosis Program and other stakeholders.

Gender Equality and Female Empowerment

  • In all training sessions, Cure Tuberculosis highlights gender aspects affecting TB diagnosis and treatment such as barriers to health care and approaches to counseling women and men. In two years, over 3,600 health care workers participated in training sessions that include different approaches to counseling women and men with TB. The project also trained 20,945 village health committee members, Health Promotion Unit specialists, community and religious leaders, volunteers, and others.
  • The absolute majority of participants of project-led training sessions are women.

Last updated: May 23, 2022

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