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November 16, 2017

The East African Community (EAC) is a regional intergovernmental organization of 6 partner states: the Republics of Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania, with its headquarters in Arusha, Tanzania. The EAC is home to over 150 million citizens and with a land area of 1.82 million square kilometres and a combined Gross Domestic Product of US$ 146 billion.

November 8, 2017

Engaging communities as partners in combating wildlife crime is critical. However, it has proven difficult to operationalize community engagement in a meaningful and sustainable manner. With some exceptions, the role of rural communities in combating wildlife crime in high value species and the conditions under which community engagement does and does not work have received little attention.

October 13, 2017

Wildlife crimes threaten the security, economy and biodiversity of East Africa. Demand for elephant ivory, rhino horn, and pangolin meat and scales continues to rise as poaching methods become increasingly sophisticated. International networks that poach, move and sell illegal wildlife products target wildlife populations across borders, creating a complex problem that transcends national boundaries. East Africa has emerged as a global hub for illegal wildlife trafficking and environmental crime in a black market that generates up to $213 billion each year.

October 4, 2017

East Africa’s economies are among the fastest-growing in the world, with technological change sweeping across the region and offering tremendous opportunities in agriculture, financial services, medicine, the manufacturing of textiles and apparel, and trade. Labor and capital are moving faster and more easily across borders. East African businesses are better able to access regional and global markets.

October 4, 2017

Economic integration is central to East Africa’s viability and strategic importance as one of the world’s fastest-growing global markets, leading to inclusive economic growth, stability and increased opportunity for the United States and its African partners. With a sustained 6.1 percent growth rate in gross domestic product (GDP), East Africa is ripe for trade and investment.

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Last updated: February 20, 2018

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