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June 3, 2020

East Africa’s remarkable biodiversity and natural resources fuel national economies and improve the lives of local communities. Yet, many people are unaware of its positive impact or of the steps they could take to conserve and protect their natural capital.

June 3, 2020

East Africa is endowed with a wealth of biodiversity and natural resources, including some of the most spectacular wildlife and ecosystems in the world. When managed effectively and equitably, these vast yet fragile lands, water and wildlife resources – or natural capital – can contribute significantly to national and regional economies and improve the lives of local communities. East Africa's tourism industry, which is almost entirely dependent on wildlife and protected areas, contributes 7.5-10 percent of GDP to the region, and it is a major driver of job creation.

June 3, 2020

As the responsibility for leadership passes to the next generation, Africa’s future and its global competitiveness will be driven by academically gifted and entrepreneurial young people empowered to lead.  USAID is providing state of the art education to millions of Kenyan children, expanding educational and employment opportunities for young adults, and preparing a new generation of young African leaders with the skills and mindset to transform the region and the continent.

May 14, 2020

Christine (not her real name) and her two children travel from Uganda to Kenya every two weeks to trade in fish and farm products. During this trip, she visits Port Victoria sub-County Hospital to refill her family’s antiretroviral (ARV) drugs.  But the arrival of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) upended her trips.

April 1, 2020

Wildlife crimes threaten the security, economy and biodiversity of East Africa. Demand for elephant ivory, rhino horn, and pangolin meat and scales continues to rise as poaching methods become increasingly sophisticated. International networks that poach, move and sell illegal wildlife products target wildlife populations across borders, creating a complex problem that transcends national boundaries. East Africa has emerged as a global hub for illegal wildlife trafficking and environmental crime in a black market that generates up to $213 billion each year.

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Last updated: August 03, 2020

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