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October 27, 2015

USAID is working in partneship with the South African government to provide support to SA's Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions that are expected to rise dramatically due to the growing economy that is dependent on fossil fuel.

The purpose of this study is to determine whether the Humana TCE programme has made a significant impact on communities where it has been implemented in terms of improving knowledge about HIV and AIDS, attitudes of personal empowerment and healthy behaviour within the context of the epidemic, and changing sexual and health seeking behaviours.

The evaluation also sets out to identify any additional effects, both positive and negative, and whether positive impacts are likely to be sustained over time.

Technical Notes is an appendix to the Evaluation Report (also known as the Main Report) of World Vision’s Network of Hope program, South Africa 2006 – 2012. Technical Notes consists of extended explanations on technical and substantive matters as necessary, tables and statistical data. This appendix has been compiled to facilitate easy reading in the Main Report. References to the Technical Notes are made throughout the Main Report and follow the sequence of that report’s sections. This appendix is available from Pact South Africa (Pretoria).


Helping young South Africans achieve their potential demands a greater investment in literacy skills of primary grade learners in a rural areas.  This challenge is being addressed through enhancing teachers’ skills and recruiting and training community members to serve as literacy volunteers.


While South Africa has dramatically improved access to education over the past decade, the quality of education remains very poor. TARMII-FP will work to address this problem by providing teachers with a computer-based assessment tool that will help teachers to more effectively address individual student learning needs in reading.

At the project’s inception, USAID/South Africa’s Health and HIV/AIDS Strategy was responding to the overwhelming challenges posed by the epidemic on individuals, families, communities and society in South Africa. There had been a dramatic rise in HIV infections during the previous decade threatening to undermine many of the advances made since efforts to transform the sector began in 1994. During the fifteen years prior to the project, HIV infection rates among pregnant women in antenatal clinics went from less than one percent (in 1990) to over 30 percent (in 2005).


Last updated: November 12, 2015

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