Fact Sheets

The Afghan Civilian Assistance Program II (ACAP II) provides humanitarian assistance to innocent civilian casualties who have suffered losses resulting from operations between U.S. and coalition military forces and the Taliban or other insurgents.  Although the number of civilians killed or injured by U.S. and coalition forces has declined, the Taliban and other insurgents continue to use indiscriminate tactics, including improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and suicide attacks, to cause significant civilian casualties.

On November 18, 2012, President Obama and Prime Minister Yingluck announced that the United States Agency for International Development Agency (USAID) and Thailand International Development Cooperation Agency (TICA) will sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to collaborate on joint development assistance in the region.

Over the past two decades, USAID has provided assistance that has helped the Russian people improve public health and combat infectious diseases, protect the environment, develop a stronger civil society, and modernize their economy. As Russia has grown into a middle income country, the nature of USAID’s work has evolved beyond primarily providing technical assistance with a large focus on collaboration.  By 2012, the majority of USAID’s engagement revolved around the promotion of an open and innovative society in Russia and a strengthened partnership between the U.S. and Russia.  The work led to many breakthroughs and transformations described below.

More than 1 billion people worldwide suffer from one or more painful, debilitating tropical diseases which disproportionately impact poor and rural populations, cause severe sickness and disability, compromise mental and physical development, contribute to childhood malnutrition, reduce school enrollment, and hinder economic productivity.

Brief descriptions of USAID's youth programs around the world.

The first phase of the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) focused on reducing HIV mortality and morbidity as quickly as possible.While basic infrastructure for evaluation and monitoring of programs existed, the main priority of the emergency response was rapid scale-up of service delivery programs.To ensure long-standing, locally owned approaches to sustaining the monu­mental increases in the availability of HIV/AIDS services enabled by PEPFAR’s first phase, the second phase of PEPFAR focuses on increasing the sustainability, cost-effectiveness, and impact of HIV/ AIDS programs in those countries hardest hit by the epidemic. 

Building on the decisions made in Bonn and Chicago, as well as the U.S.-Afghanistan Strategic Partnership Agreement, the United States joined over 70 partners in Tokyo to underline our continuing support for Afghanistan’s efforts to strengthen itself and provide a more peaceful, secure, and prosperous future for its people through the conclusion of the security transition in 2014 and into the Transformation Decade. 

The New Alliance is a shared commitment to achieve sustained and inclusive agricultural growth in sub-Saharan Africa. New Alliance efforts will help lift 50 million people out of poverty over the next 10 years by aligning the commitments of Africa’s leadership to drive effective country-led plans and policies for food security and nutrition; the intentions of private sector partners to increase investments where the conditions are right; and the commitments of G-8 members to expand Africa’s potential for rapid and sustained agricultural growth.

Across the globe, the United States prioritizes investments in development innovations that are low cost and have the power to improve millions of lives. USAID's Innovation Fund for the Americas (IFA) seeks cost-effective breakthrough solutions to development challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The Broadband Partnership of the Americas (BPA) is designed to improve access to broadband and the Internet and other communications technologies in the Americas. It will serve as a voluntary and flexible framework through which the governments of the Western Hemisphere, multilateral organizations, the donor community and the private sector can collaborate to increase access to broadband and the Internet across the Americas.

Pages

Last updated: January 21, 2018

Share This Page