Fact Sheets

Central Asia is one of the few regions in the world where the HIV epidemic continues to grow. Currently, most infections occur within concentrated high risk groups, including people who inject drugs (PWID) and their injecting and sexual partners. Sixty percent of the cumulative HIV cases in the region have been reported among PWID. The epidemiological data show that female sex workers (FSW) and men who have sex with men (MSM) are also disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS relative to the general population.

The U.S. government is leading the world’s humanitarian and health assistance response to the COVID-19 pandemic. We are mobilizing all necessary resources to respond rapidly, both at home and abroad. As part of this comprehensive and generous U.S. response, the State Department and USAID are providing an initial investment of nearly $274 million in emergency health and humanitarian assistance to help countries in need, on top of the funding we already provide to multilateral organizations such as the World Health Organization and UNICEF.

Central Asia has the potential to re-establish a commercially viable, market-based power system. A Central Asia Regional Electricity Market, or CAREM, will assure the region’s long-term energy security and economic growth and also serve as a platform for an expanded Central Asia-South Asia regional power market.

USAID partners with communities, hospitals, and ministries in all Central Asian countries to improve TB diagnosis and treatment and to adopt cutting-edge methods and technologies to stop the spread of tuberculosis. USAID also supports innovative approaches to address TB among migrants and other at-risk populations and has worked with the governments of all Central Asian countries to develop effective and comprehensive treatment plans for people with TB in the region.

In recent years, the Government of Uzbekistan has demonstrated a significant commitment to developing the pharmaceutical industry and achieving international standards for medicines quality assurance systems. This commitment was reflected in a number of presidential decrees and resolutions, including two from 2019 – the Presidential Decree (UP-5707) on further measures for the accelerated development of the pharmaceutical industry in the Republic of Uzbekistan (2019-2021) and the Resolution of the President of the Republic of Uzbekistan (PP-4554) on additional measures for the strengthening of reforms in the pharmaceutical industry of the Republic of Uzbekistan.

The Safe Migration in Central Asia project uses evidence-based practices and cross-border connections to strengthen the mutual accountability and effectiveness of governments, NGOs, and the private sector to prevent trafficking-in-persons, protect survivors, and promote safe migration, as part of USAID’s Asia-wide suite of counter-trafficking interventions. Safe Migration in Central Asia is a five-year project implemented by Winrock International in Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan.

The USAID/Central Asia Governance Support Program aims to strengthen the accountability, effectiveness and transparency of government institutions in Turkmenistan in addition to improving public administration of government institutions and strengthening policy development and the lawmaking processes.

The Land for Prosperity Activity works with the Government of Colombia to foster rural economic development by addressing the challenges stemming from informal land rights. The activity is focused on land titling programs, strengthening government capacities to manage land, and creating legal economic opportunities in violence-affected areas.

The Civil Society Support Program in Central Asia is a five-year, $18 million program implemented by Eurasia Foundation to cultivate a vibrant and responsive civil society throughout the region, including Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, and build a new generation of forward-looking civil society leaders (2019-2024).

Based on public surveys, citizens of Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) consistently rank corruption as one of the biggest problems in the country. Despite the positive steps taken to stop corruption – numerous reforms, strategies and measures – corruption in BiH remains widespread. The cancer of corruption corrodes political stability, economic growth, and the country’s progress toward EU integration and self-reliance.

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Last updated: April 01, 2020

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