Map of Ethiopia

Newsroom

One of the graduates from the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples Region of Ethiopia receives her certificate
June 19, 2015

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia – The U.S. Government, through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), held a graduation ceremony today for 63 women who received technical and business skills development training. The training provided them with the skillsets needed to become successful owners and operators of dairy, meat and live animal businesses.

The training was organized in order to address gaps identified during an analysis conducted in 2012, which showed that women working in the dairy and livestock sectors lacked the leadership knowledge, access to and control of business resources, decision-making powers and business plan preparation skills necessary to become successful entrepreneurs.

Workers demonstrate how the livestock grinder works. The equipment was provided to Ethio-Feed through a USAID grant.
December 8, 2014

The U.S. Government, through the United States Agency for International Development’s (USAID’s) Agricultural Growth Program-Livestock Market Development activity, today held a ribbon cutting ceremony to open a livestock feed manufacturing facility financed, in part, through a USAID grant to Ethio-Feed PLC. The manufacturing equipment provided to Ethio-Feed will create easy access to affordable and nutritious livestock feed for over 350 dairy farmers and feedlot operators in the Bako, Sire and Anno districts of the Oromia Region. The feed ingredients come from agricultural by-products that are readily available.

December 4, 2014

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Ministry of Health, Amhara and Tigray regional health bureaus and a Management Sciences for Health (MSH)-led consortium of international and Ethiopian partners celebrated achievements of the Ethiopia Network for HIV/AIDS Treatment, Care and Support (ENHAT-CS) program, which has significantly contributed to comprehensive HIV care and treatment in health centers in the Amhara and Tigray regions.

November 28, 2014

USAID and CCRDA share a common mission in Ethiopia.

At USAID, we fundamentally believe that ending extreme poverty requires inclusive, broad-based, sustainable growth; free, peaceful, and self-reliant societies with effective, legitimate governments; human development through health and education, and social safety nets that reach the poorest and most vulnerable. Similarly, our cross-cutting efforts in promoting good governance, empowering women and girls, and mitigating climate change are all essential to ending poverty.

Resilient, democratic societies don’t simply maintain stability: they are essential to sustaining development progress. At USAID we believe they embrace not only elections, but also legitimate, inclusive, and accountable institutions that effectively deliver services to all of their people, advancing human dignity and development. They have the ability to manage conflict, mitigate the impact of natural disasters, and forestall crisis that otherwise roll back development gains.

Why do we do this on behalf of the American people? In addition to the moral and humanitarian imperatives to assist those in need, the United States is safer and stronger when fewer people face destitution, when our trading partners are flourishing, when nations around the world can withstand crisis.

USAID Ethiopia Acting Mission Director Gary Linden at the launch of ETHIOLANDNET, a new network forum.
November 25, 2014

USAID Acting Mission Director, Gary Linden joined President of Bahir Dar University, Dr. Bayile Damte, researchers of the Institute for Land Administration, and academics from around Ethiopia to launch the Ethiopian Land Research and Development Network (ETHIOLANDNET) to close gaps in policy research on land.

November 24, 2014

I am pleased to represent USAID at this very timely launch of the Lancet Every Newborn series here in Ethiopia designed to focus our collective efforts on addressing one of the most pressing issues for our child survival agenda, preventable newborn deaths. Thanks to the leadership and determination of the Ministry of Health and health workers across the country coupled with the support from many partners here today, much progress has been made in reducing under-five child mortality with Ethiopia proudly achieving MDG goal of cutting under-five mortality by two-thirds.

Yet while the 2014 mini-DHS results tells us that more mothers are giving birth with the assistance of a health care professional, even more are seeking ante-natal care, and many more are using contraception to space births. Newborns constitute 43 percent of under five deaths in Ethiopia, close to the world average of 44 percent, and represent a larger proportion of under-five deaths now than they did in 1990. Thus, despite progress in child survival, the single most important remaining cause of death among children less than five years of age is newborn deaths—deaths within the first 28 days of life.

Pages

Last updated: June 29, 2015

Share This Page