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Steam rising from the ground is evidence of the tremendous geothermal potential in the Corbetti caldera.
July 30, 2015

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - During President Barack Obama's visit to Ethiopia this week, Ethiopian Electric Power and Corbetti Geothermal Plc signed Ethiopia’s first independent power purchase agreement for up to 500 megawatts (MW) of clean geothermal power from the Corbetti geothermal source. Investors in the Corbetti geothermal project include Power Africa partner Reykjavik Geothermal, Power Africa partner Berkeley Energy, and Iceland Drilling.

Ethiopian Electric Power is also in negotiations to sign a heads of terms agreement with Reykjavik Geothermal further detailing a previous agreement to develop an additional 500 MW in the Tulu Moye and Abaya areas. Together, these two agreements have the potential to generate up to 1,000 MW in new power for Ethiopia, enough to provide power for up to two million households.   

(left to right) U.S. Ambassador Patricia Haslach, Ethiopian First Lady Roman Tesfaye, and USAID Mission Director Dennis Weller a
January 21, 2015

And we are especially honored to have Ethiopia’s First Lady join us this morning to officially open the conference. She has been a very important advocate for strengthening the role of women in the professional world, and her presence today also shows Ethiopia’s support for this important initiative that addresses the role of women in agribusiness.

USAID’s Gary Linden and Siana Tackett join Abduljelil Reshad, Mulugeta Asmara, and a NIB bank representative.
December 9, 2014

USAID in cooperation with the Ethiopia Federal Ministry of Health convened a National Private Health Sector Exhibition from December 9-10, 2014, at the Hilton Addis Ababa. Organized by USAID’s Strengthening Health Outcomes through the Private Sector (SHOPS) project with funding from the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the event showcased the contribution of the private health sector and examined future prospects, with a focus on financing for products and services.

Workers demonstrate how the livestock grinder works. The equipment was provided to Ethio-Feed through a USAID grant.
December 8, 2014

The U.S. Government, through the United States Agency for International Development’s (USAID’s) Agricultural Growth Program-Livestock Market Development activity, today held a ribbon cutting ceremony to open a livestock feed manufacturing facility financed, in part, through a USAID grant to Ethio-Feed PLC. The manufacturing equipment provided to Ethio-Feed will create easy access to affordable and nutritious livestock feed for over 350 dairy farmers and feedlot operators in the Bako, Sire and Anno districts of the Oromia Region. The feed ingredients come from agricultural by-products that are readily available.

December 4, 2014

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Ministry of Health, Amhara and Tigray regional health bureaus and a Management Sciences for Health (MSH)-led consortium of international and Ethiopian partners celebrated achievements of the Ethiopia Network for HIV/AIDS Treatment, Care and Support (ENHAT-CS) program, which has significantly contributed to comprehensive HIV care and treatment in health centers in the Amhara and Tigray regions.

November 28, 2014

USAID and CCRDA share a common mission in Ethiopia.

At USAID, we fundamentally believe that ending extreme poverty requires inclusive, broad-based, sustainable growth; free, peaceful, and self-reliant societies with effective, legitimate governments; human development through health and education, and social safety nets that reach the poorest and most vulnerable. Similarly, our cross-cutting efforts in promoting good governance, empowering women and girls, and mitigating climate change are all essential to ending poverty.

Resilient, democratic societies don’t simply maintain stability: they are essential to sustaining development progress. At USAID we believe they embrace not only elections, but also legitimate, inclusive, and accountable institutions that effectively deliver services to all of their people, advancing human dignity and development. They have the ability to manage conflict, mitigate the impact of natural disasters, and forestall crisis that otherwise roll back development gains.

Why do we do this on behalf of the American people? In addition to the moral and humanitarian imperatives to assist those in need, the United States is safer and stronger when fewer people face destitution, when our trading partners are flourishing, when nations around the world can withstand crisis.

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Last updated: July 30, 2015

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