USAID Launches the USAID Saving Species Activity to help Vietnam Combat Wildlife Trafficking

Speeches Shim

Thursday, May 17, 2018
U.S. Ambassador Daniel J. Kritenbrink and Permanent Deputy Minister of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development Dr. Ha Cong Tuan join other distinguished guests at the launch.
USAID/Vietnam

Global wildlife crime continues to rise at exponential rates and has reached crisis levels – it now constitutes a black market valued at up to $20 billion/year. In recent years, Vietnam has seen a dramatic increase in the illegal trade and consumption of rhino horn, ivory, pangolins, big cats, and other endangered species.

On May 11, U.S. Ambassador Daniel J. Kritenbrink and Permanent Deputy Minister of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development Dr. Ha Cong Tuan officially launched USAID Saving Species - a $10 million activity to combat wildlife trafficking. Over 100 Government of Vietnam (GVN) and NGO stakeholders attended the launch. USAID Saving Species works with the GVN to reduce consumer demand for and consumption of illegal wildlife; strengthen wildlife law enforcement and prosecution; and improve the legal framework for wildlife crime. Primary biodiversity targets of USAID Saving Species are African rhinos, African and Asian elephants, and pangolins. The activity’s targeted geographic locations include major cities such as Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City, and Danang, as well as transit points for the illegal trade, such as border crossings, ports, and airports.

So What? Wildlife trafficking is a lucrative form of transnational crime that is decimating populations of elephants, rhinos, pangolins, and more. Under the Saving Species project, USAID and the GVN will work together to address this critical issue.

Last updated: February 18, 2021

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