Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

Sima Sajadi, a 25-year-old high school teacher, attended a training in Kabul in April on best teaching methods. Twenty-two private school teachers, both employed and those searching for work, attended the training. The teachers study active, practical teaching methods like role-playing, discussion groups, brainstorming and networking.

Like many traditional Afghan farmers in the Panjwayi district of Kandahar province, Mohammad Salim once grew poppies to support his family.

These performances have drawn more than 6,600 spectators from across the four provinces since April. Farmers laughed along with friends and neighbors, but also walked away with valuable knowledge. Shows have covered topics such as pomegranate harvest techniques, vaccinating against livestock diseases, and wheat fertilizer application.

Improving economic growth is difficult if half the population is excluded. Sadly, female participation in Kosovo’s workforce is one of the lowest in Europe. However, USAID is assisting women to improve their skills and their incomes.

Classroom instruction doesn’t always prepare students for real world work challenges and conditions, but universities and vocational colleges in Asia’s Lower Mekong subregion are staying ahead of the curve. They are bringing industry and technology into the schools.

Despite a lack of electricity or running water, nine communities in Papua New Guinea’s Almami area of Madang province are taking charge of their environment and providing an example to other communities and their government on climate change adaptation and mitigation.

Globally, there are 2.4 billion people without access to safe, clean bathrooms. In Indonesia, this means that one in three people does not have access to a flush toilet, latrine or septic system. Many still defecate in the open.

"Our dreams are very simple. To have a decent living that would allow us to be sufficient and not put out a hand to beg. We want people to look at us as humans, because we’re just like them."

Assem Abdallah, 20, is much like the typical university student in the United States—bright, eager to learn. He was forced to flee his home in Idlib three years ago because of the conflict that has torn his country apart.

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Last updated: December 09, 2015