USAID Response in Ukraine

Speeches Shim

USAID Response in Ukraine

The U.S. Government’s partnership with the people of Ukraine is steadfast and enduring, and USAID remains committed to supporting Ukraine and its people in this current crisis. We have worked closely with Ukraine, our European allies, and humanitarian assistance partners to prepare for the emergency that this war has caused and meet immediate and growing humanitarian needs. 

USAID deployed a Disaster Assistance Response Team—our nation’s finest humanitarian responders—to the region to support the Ukrainian people as they flee Russia’s aggression and to rapidly address critical needs that arise due to ongoing conflict. We have already responded to a range of needs in the lead-up to the invasion, from energy security to countering disinformation to cybersecurity support as Russia attempts to disrupt critical infrastructure and communications. We will continue to assess and ramp up access to primary and trauma medical care, food, and clean water. USAID is also working closely with the U.S. State Department to support Ukrainians fleeing to neighboring countries.

Last updated: April 12, 2022

February 28, 2022

In terms of the humanitarian response, I do think that opening up a corridor for the people of Kyiv, you will start to see some flow out. And our planning assumptions range, there's a very wide range, but I think it would not be crazy, if the war were to continue, to see as many as you know, three to 5 million people flowing into these neighboring countries. So, getting this flow going and ensuring that the welcome mat, that the arrivals are receiving in each of the frontline countries, that that continues.

February 28, 2022

Yesterday in Poland, Administrator Power met with Major General Chris Donahue and members of the 82nd Airborne Division, who briefed the Administrator and members of her delegation, including senior leadership of the Department of State’s Bureau for Population, Refugees, and Migration, on the situation in Ukraine. Russian military strikes have hit civilian facilities and critical non-military infrastructure, including at least one hospital, an orphanage, and multiple kindergartens. As the conflict intensifies, especially in urban areas, civilians will bear the brunt and continue to seek safety in Poland and other neighboring countries.

February 27, 2022

Well, I think Russia’s actions in recent days and in recent months as they built up to this invasion and the kind of fake diplomacy that was carried out by Russian officials over a long period of time as they planned to invade their neighbor, would give one grounds for pessimism. But on the other hand, there is nothing more important than diplomacy during a conflict. We see the human stakes—I saw the human stakes today in talking to those same Ukrainian refugees you just heard from coming across the border. And if this conflict continues it’s only going to get worse.

February 27, 2022

The United States, through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S. Department of State, is providing nearly $54 million in additional humanitarian assistance to Ukraine following Russia’s unprovoked and unjustified further invasion of Ukraine, which is expected to trigger increased needs.

February 26, 2022

Today in Poland, Administrator Power met with Witold Dzielski, Advisor to the President of Poland, to discuss joint efforts to respond to Russia’s unprovoked and unjustified invasion of Ukraine. Administrator Power emphasized the partnership between the United States and Poland in meeting the needs of the increasing flow of Ukrainians across the border.

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