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November 2, 2016

The 2011 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey (2011 UDHS) was designed as a follow-up to the 1988/89, 1995, 2000-01, and 2006 Uganda DHS surveys. The main objective of the 2011 UDHS was to obtain current statistical data on the Ugandan population’s demographic characteristics, family planning efforts, maternal mortality, and infant and child mortality. Another objective was to collect information on health care services and activities, antenatal, delivery, and postnatal care, children’s immunisations, and management of childhood diseases. In addition, the survey was designed to evaluate the nutritional status of mothers and children, to measure the prevalence of anaemia among women and children, to assess the level of knowledge about HIV and AIDS among men and women, and to determine the extent of interpersonal violence.

September 15, 2016

I want to begin by appreciating the hard work and commitment that all of you here have undertaken to strengthen Uganda’s institutions of accountability over the past two years. When we look at what was identified in 2014, the last time this joint review with donors took place, as the key challenges in the sector and then examine the progress that has been made, I think there is a lot to be proud of. From the passage of the PFM Act 2015, to the amendment of tax laws and regulations to increase domestic resource mobilization, to efforts to reach out and include civil society and more citizens’ voices, to the imminent installment of a new e-procurement system, much has been accomplished.

August 26, 2016

The U.S. Mission to Uganda has announced a donation of $3 million to the United Nations World Food Program (WFP) in support of refugees in Uganda. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), through the Office of Food for Peace (FFP), provided the funding to WFP on behalf of the American people.

Uganda is in the midst of a demographic tsunami with its population doubling every 16 years. Uganda’s systems must be transformed to rapidly increase agricultural productivity, curb accelerating environmental degradation, alleviate the burden of communicable diseases, and educate and train a more and increasingly younger population of Ugandans that need to be both more productive and more involved as citizens. The rapidly growing population exacerbates high levels of youth unemployment and amplifies pressures on social, natural and other resources. Inadequately addressed, these issues will lead to a growing number of marginalized Ugandans without access to public or other services; lacking resilience to shocks and stresses; and held back from their progress; and, thus, unable to realize their individual or collective potential.

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Newsroom articles for USAID Uganda

Last updated: October 24, 2017

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