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Transforming Lives

Program participants stand in line to receive a cash transfer for food outside a training facility in Juba, South Sudan

For one week each month, Clementina Peter Loku, a 56-year-old widow and resident of South Sudan’s capital city of Juba, walks daily to a local training center to take classes on practical life skills—including nutrition, hygiene promotion, home gardening, entrepreneurship and income generation strategies. In exchange, she receives a monthly cash transfer of approximately $45 that allows her to feed her family.

The health of this family in South Sudan improved after receiving care through a USAID primary health care project.

Mercy Edward was pregnant when fighting erupted near the home she and her husband Abraham Charles Zinone shared in Western Equatoria, South Sudan, in May 2015. The civil war that began in the capital, Juba, in December 2013 had now spread west.

Six-year-old Yohana Peter and his mother Asunta Wasuk seek treatment for his malaria at Al Sabah Children's Hospital in Juba.

Six-year-old Yohana Peter clutches a bottle of mango juice as he waits for his medication outside a pharmacy at Al Sabah Children’s Hospital in Juba, South Sudan. Seated next to his mother on a metal bench, Yohana looks anxious.

Nyaradio Gatkuoth at the UN Protection of Civilians site in Juba, which houses nearly 28,000 people displaced by conflict

South Sudan now has more children not attending school than any other country, according to the United Nations—1.8 million children aged 6 to 15.

Ministry of Wildlife officials work with USAID partners to catalog and test confiscated elephant tusks.

South Sudan’s dwindling elephant population—there are only an estimated 2,500 remaining—is under threat from poachers who illegally sell their ivory tusks. Their precarious survival is threatened even more by conflict and lack of government resources.

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Last updated: August 14, 2017

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