Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

Thirty years ago, families in Mozambique’s village of Nhantumbi could rely on regular rainfall to cultivate their crops and feed their families. Since then, unpredictable rains, deforestation and unsustainable agricultural practices have caused a steep decline in productivity in Nhantumbi and neighboring villages.

In Mali’s rural community of Tienfala, the emergency evacuation and referral system was not functioning, due in part to poor financial management. In most cases, no funding was available for emergency transport to health facilities for women developing problems during pregnancy or childbirth.

Tucked away at the back of the Caribbean Christian Center for the Deaf in Kingston, Jamaica, sits the quaint E3 Café, home of Deaf Can! Coffee. With a megawatt smile and warm welcome, 21-year-old Fabian Jackson eagerly greets his customers and directs them to a board with instructions on how to order coffee.

This year the Kankor Examination, Afghanistan’s high-stakes university entry exam, had an unprecedented 169,529 students complete the test. Reza Rafat, a participant in USAID’s Kankor preparation program, had the highest score in the country.

Every year, dozens of mothers and children die from preventable illnesses and health conditions in Afghanistan, a land-locked country with among the highest maternal and child mortality rates globally. Most of these deaths occur because of lack of access to health services and low levels of awareness to key health and hygiene practices in rural communities. Complications and potential deaths may be averted through maternal and child health awareness campaigns.

After founding the Sahib Zaman Carpet Manufacturer Co. in Kabul in 2008, they found their success hampered by the poor availability of wool yarn. Unable to invest in more spinning machines to employ more spinners, the company had no choice but to rely on costly, low-quality wool yarn imported from Pakistan.

Each week in southern Haiti, Lucamène Chéry puts on her uniform and stocks her market stall with local vegetables. Shoppers filter past, selecting products for their families. In exchange for the produce, Chéry accepts a unique form of payment—food vouchers—which allows the most vulnerable members of the community to access nutritious foods that they would otherwise be unable to afford.

Wildlife crime is on the rise throughout sub-Saharan Africa and, with over 20 national parks and 34 game management areas, Zambia is not immune. Accounting for over 7 percent of the country’s gross domestic product, Zambia’s tourism industry is under threat from poaching and illegal wildlife trafficking.

Avgust 2017 – Trimor Hiseni, 27-godišnjak koji je inače gradsko dete, nikada nije ni sanjao da će jednog dana postati uspešni poljoprivrednik uzgajivač malina i inspiracija mladim ljudima na Kosovu.

U proleće 2016. godine, koristeći sopstvena sredstva, kupio je 24.000 sadnica maline vrhunskog kvaliteta i zasadio ih na 3 hektara zemlje, koje je iznajmio. Njegova ideja da započne biznis u poljoprivredi i investira u uzgoju malina došla je kao rezultat ispitivanja i razgovora sa već postojećim uzgajivačima.

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Last updated: November 01, 2017