Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

Fresh milk. Somalis have got it, although most of the population drinks imported powdered milk since local production cannot meet the high demand for safe, fresh milk. By the time it is squeezed from the cow, collected, and transported to processing plants and stores, most Somali milk is already spoiled.

Seeing a clear business opportunity, Hoxha started importing drilling machinery to produce the raw materials needed for post-war reconstruction. After spending time abroad, Hoxha was eager to do something good for his country. But when the time came to pay his electric bill, he received a real shock.

A positive attitude and a strong belief that looking back is less useful than looking forward helped Kateryna Kyselyova, a young internally displaced person in Ukraine, not only to move on but changed her life completely. Before her displacement, she worked as a lawyer in Horlivka, Donetsk oblast, and sewing was merely a hobby. “Since the circumstances forced me to reboot my entire life, I decided to change my profession as well!” says Kyselyova.

Maïmouna Diakité, 31, is a mother of six children and a member of the Sigui Diya (“Respect Each Other” in the Bambara language) producer cooperative in Mali. Before January 2015, she was trying to provide for her family through small–scale gardening activities during the off-season, working hard, but making very little money in return.

Crisha*, 7, lives on a remote islet called Silagon in the Philippines’ central region of Cebu. Electricity, fresh water and produce are scarce and expensive for the 300 people who live there. Families must frequently visit the main island of Bantayan — about 40 minutes away by boat — to get basic necessities.

Last year, John could not read the alphabet. Worried that he might have a learning disability, John’s mother, Chesa*, nearly pulled him out of first grade to retake kindergarten. But John’s teacher, Ruffa Maboloc, persuaded Chesa to let John stay in her class because he was clearly committed to learn.

Djenabou Camara is a 30-year-old mother of five children and a member of the Nèma Gardeners Association in the prefecture of Boffa in Guinea. She earns most of her money from growing vegetables on a hectare of land allocated to her by the association. She decided to go into petty trade to help support the family.

“You can pay me with your money or your life,” a man from the armed group responded when Luis told him that he couldn’t afford the monthly “protection” fee demanded by the group. When the group murdered his best friend who could also not afford to pay, Luis knew that the threat was serious.

According to the International Labor Organization, Albania ranked first in the world this year in youth unemployment. Youth have expressed discontent with the government for not meeting its obligation to them by effectively implementing the National Action Plan 2015-2020, which was designed “to develop and coordinate cross sectoral policies in education, employment, health, culture and enhance youth participation in social life and decision making processes.”  

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Last updated: January 17, 2018