Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

Jessica Nguyen had gender reassignment surgery, but for years her passport and identification did not reflect this important change in her gender identity. Potential employers would not hire her because they did not know how to classify her, as male or female. Her employment search became an experience in stigma and discrimination.

Walk by the average Vietnamese construction site and you will probably see some heads without hard hats, people without vests, bare feet or sandals and minimal harnesses or fall protection. As in many developing countries, lower costs are still often prioritized over worker safety on the average local building project.

The Mogadishu Book Fair has exposed the other side of Somalia’s capital city. The fair, held Aug. 17-19, brought together authors, poets, academics, playwrights, motivational speakers and literary scholars from across the Somali region and around the world. It showcased more than 3,000 books covering all types of literature from comedy, drama and romance to satire, tragedy and nonfiction.

Internships and job placement services provide women the opportunity to gain work experience, prove their capabilities to employers, and secure new or better positions.

Looking to address the unique needs of the people living in Ghor, the USAID-funded HEMAYAT Project and the Afghan government came up with a solution: take healthcare directly to the villagers, like those living in Dawlatyar.

Fouzia Hariri was one of 40 Afghan traders participating in the inaugural “Made in Afghanistan” exhibition and conference on July 19-20, 2016, in New Delhi, India, organized with the support of USAID’s Afghanistan Trade and Revenue (ATAR) project.

In a quiet corner of bustling downtown Ho Chi Minh City, Thu Nguyen Tan starts his working day by logging in on Facebook. His inbox is filled up with messages from young urban men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW) seeking advice on a broad range of issues. Some are seeking guidance on safe sex and HIV protection. Others are interested in accessing HIV testing services, and are unsure where to go or are scared of being judged.

/sites/default/files/documents/1861/FS_HealthyMarkets_Sept2016_Eng.pdfLe Minh Thanh is the leader of G-Link, a community-based organization and social enterprise supporting men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW) in Ho Chi Minh City. Thanh is also one of Vietnam’s first HIV lay testing providers. In this role, he delivers HIV testing services directly to MSM and TG clients using a rapid HIV finger prick, a diagnostic that can be administered easily and quickly.

As the poorest country in Europe, Moldovan citizens face many challenges when it comes to finding decent jobs at home. Given this and other economic and social challenges, thousands of Moldovans are forced to move to larger cities or go abroad to support their families and provide better opportunities for their children.

Pages

Last updated: November 28, 2016