Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

Non-transparent public procurement awards are common in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH). More than 75 percent of all public procurements were conducted behind closed doors, through direct negotiations, in 2015. This year, however, one company that fought the corrupt process finally won damages from a local government.

In Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), violence against women and girls is widespread and underreported—an all-too-common dirty little secret. The issue does not get the attention and time it deserves, and neither do the perpetrators. But a nationwide campaign—that included petitions, billboards and a special postage stamp—recently stirred unprecedented civil society and political will to better prevent and properly punish such acts.

Civil society in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) is demanding integrity and responsibility from the government. That says a lot for a country where citizens in yearly surveys rank corruption as one of the biggest problems in the country while expressing the belief that they cannot do anything to stop it.

In Mauritania’s Guidimakha region—which faces recurrent drought, lack of water access, and persistent food and nutrition insecurity—a women’s cooperative called Dioubaye works to improve access to nutritious food, water and income for its members and community.

Health care professionals and the general public perceive the need for human capital investment and skills development in the Afghan medical sector; investment into the sector is needed as is the availability of qualified staff proficient in the use of medical technology. Internships provided through USAID Promote: Women in the Economy (WIE) are giving Afghan women the work experience they need to find jobs in the healthcare sector.

Managing a national electric utility in a poor, unstable country such as Afghanistan is challenging on many fronts, not the least of which is maintaining financial records. The utility Da Afghanistan Breshna Sherkat (DABS), established in 2008, had been processing all financial records by-hand. Consequently, annual financial audits contained serious disclaimers, DABS was late paying employees and filing taxes, and donors were hesitant to disburse money through DABS’ financial systems.

“The dream I have for my future, is to run my own fashion production company, where we create our own clothing designs,” twenty-two-year-old Mahsuma Sultani Jawana graduate said.

Under the USAID Strengthening Education in Afghanistan Phase II project, 220 girls schools across Afghanistan have been equipped with solar panel technology to help provide electricity to enable better teaching and learning – including the Abubakar Sidiq Girls High School.

Abdul Khaliq, 27, lives in a small house with his family in Laghman province. Khaliq is a double amputee; however, unlike most of the estimated 43,528 amputees in Afghanistan, he is able to grasp objects and perform routine daily tasks through the use of an electric hand provided to him through USAID’s Afghan Civilian Assistance Program (ACAP III).

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Last updated: July 12, 2017