Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

Thirty-eight-year-old Jennifer, a hairdresser and single mother of four, has been HIV-positive for 14 years. While she is now a strong activist and advocate for the HIV community, this was not always the case. In 1999, when she first learned of her positive status, she feared the stigma that the virus carried with it and, more importantly, the impact that it would have on her children’s lives and futures.

March 2016—Mohammad Khalid Al-Sa’idiyyin, an experienced Jordanian trail guide who has worked informally in the tourism sector for years, is one of two site stewards at Bi’r Mathkour working to educate others about the community’s local relics.

Household cultivation holds a place at the very heart of Jordanian customs and traditions. Visit your everyday Jordanian homestead and chances are you will come across the family olive tree, garden or orchard.

When USAID supported the local government with the installation of 27 solar streetlights on the main street in Baidoa, life for residents changed overnight. As in many other cities in Somalia, residents are now doing business and socializing on the streets after sunset.

Due to USAID’s support in five coastal communities of Somalia, improvements in cold storage and stronger ties between fishermen and fishing associations are reducing the appeal of piracy by promoting economic growth and food security along the coast.

Election periods often have the potential to stoke tension and threaten social cohesion. Rising tension can sometimes spill over into outbreaks of violence, as Côte d’Ivoire experienced in 2010 before, during and after the polls.

March 2016—Following the violence of the 2010 presidential elections, many Ivorian women were reluctant to take part in the electoral process after experiencing traumatic events, including forced displacement, rape and killings. These women had come to consider elections as synonymous with trouble.

The five-year Local Governance Project in Tajikistan, which launched in 2012, is designed to help the country implement the Law on Local Self-Governance in Towns and Townships. The project partners with 20 jamoats (communes) in 10 districts across all four regions of Tajikistan to improve local governments’ delivery of services to citizens, particularly, clean drinking water.

Recognizing the role of men as key decisionmakers in Tajik families, USAID’s Maternal and Child Health project is working to provide men with the necessary information and incentives to serve as partners and leaders in improving the health of their families and communities.

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Last updated: June 09, 2016