Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

Februar 2016. – Kosovo ima pravni problem. Nagomilan broj od preko 400.000 nerešenih predmeta čeka presudu, a pojedini predmeti u sudovima mogu da traju od četiri do šest godina. Više od 100.000 neizvršenih presuda posebno pogađaju poslovne sporove.

In the 1990s, the Kosovo education system was in chaos, especially for ethnic minority students. For education in their native language, Albanian-speaking students could only attend informal, privately run classes. Minority Roma, Ashkali and Egyptian children largely didn’t go to school at all.

People leaving in the village of Arijuana in Mozambique's Zambezia province must travel 25 to 50 kilometers on foot to access basic health care. The distance is often too far for the sick to undertake. A new health center in the final stages of construction, however, stands as a testament to perseverance and ingenuity amid a harsh and isolated environment.

February 2016—Kosovo has a legal problem. A backlog of more than 400,000 cases await adjudication, and cases in the courts can last four to six years. More than 100,000 unenforced judgments particularly affect business disputes.

February 2016—Women with disabilities in Ukraine are receiving better access to health care now that medical professionals understand what it’s like to lack mobility.

January 2016—The majority of internally displaced persons in Ukraine face not only financial difficulties and trouble adapting to new surroundings, but also face prejudice from local citizens and say social exclusion is a major burden.

Internal conflict left the town of Menaka in northern Mali occupied by a succession of rebel groups for three years. It also left them without electricity.

"The development of a knowledge-based economy, primarily in the context of IT technologies, is Niš’s biggest opportunity for development,” said Dejan Pavlović, CEO of Ates Soft, one of the Niš Cluster of Advanced Technologies member companies that support the ICT Academy by offering job opportunities and experience to its graduates. “There is no time to waste. It’s time to take action!” he added.

In 2013, the country’s overall unemployment rate was greater than 20 percent, with youth unemployment exceeding 50 percent. Labor law restricted workplace flexibility, hiring procedures, and employment policies, leading businesses to stay out of the market and creating barriers for job creation. Yet, much of the Serbian population was uninformed about the key problems in the labor market, and some interested parties—such as trade and labor unions—feared that reforms would disrupt business and employment.

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Last updated: March 04, 2016