Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

USAID’s support to the Government of India’s Revised National TB Control Program has led to improvements in TB case detection and treatment success rates, and to achieving national targets in priority geographic areas. Interventions are designed to improve and scale comprehensive HIV/TB services; strengthen and accredit laboratories for diagnosis of multidrug-resistant TB; improve airborne infection control; introduce new diagnostics; and increase involvement of private providers.

Like every day, Satyavati Devi has just finished singing the same lullaby to her 3-month-old son, Shubham. And like every day, Shubham quickly falls asleep in his mother’s arms to the gentle sounds of her humming. Careful not to wake him up, Devi quietly puts Shubham on the bed and begins to tiptoe out of the room. After she walks a few steps, Devi turns around and goes back to kiss Shubham on his forehead.

Most victims of gender-based violence suffer for long periods in silence. As the violence is often perpetuated behind closed doors, its detection remains a challenge.

For Indian farmers like Nathuni Singh, climate change has become a stark reality. Summers are searing ahead of schedule in north India, where wheat growers in Bihar and eastern Uttar Pradesh can lose 25 percent of their crop harvest.

In Bangalore, India’s information technology hub, 72 percent of the drinking water is contaminated and a majority of the population does not have access to clean drinking water facilities.

When Ayugi Stella learned that she had the same rights to inherit land as the men around her, she decided to speak up for herself, her sisters and the other women in her community. Her hard work paid off—she persuaded her father to share his land equally with his children, and now she cultivates 3 acres of her own.

Mwape Kabazo, a 35-year-old mother in Mango village, has seen firsthand how quickly a child’s health can turn. When her 4-year-old son, Kisile Lusinga, began to show signs of malnutrition and his health suffered, she held off on seeking care. However, when his health began to deteriorate, she wondered who to turn to.

For many years, Zimbabweans have been caught in a cycle of drought, poor soil fertility, weak harvests and suffering health. With a potentially record-breaking El Niño weather pattern forecasted for 2016, drought-vulnerable nations across the globe, including Zimbabwe, are bracing for another year of poor rains and dry soil.

In the highlands of Ethiopia, malnutrition affects 44 percent of children under 5, and as many as 81 percent of all cases of child undernutrition go untreated.

Pages

Last updated: March 17, 2016