Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

For Spin Boldak, a border town in southern Afghanistan, the business permit is more than just a piece of paper. It is a sustainable growth strategy.

For families living in Bangladesh, putting enough food on the table can be a daily struggle. Natural disasters, poor health and hygiene services, and high unemployment are just some of the issues facing the 37 million Bangladeshis considered to be food insecure.
 

Katchy Kollections Director Jennifer Mulli desires global recognition for her brand—Jiamini—Kiswahili for “believe in yourself.” It’s a bold goal for someone who has only been in business for three years. But given her current trajectory, Mulli may very well succeed.

Mulli’s family-run Kenyan business sells clothing and accessories inspired by “a deep affection for its African cultural heritage and wealth of design possibilities influenced by the Western fashion scene.” They specialize in detailing their products with high-quality beading.

Because of its fine leather and commitment to top quality, Ethiopia has recently become a magnet for international retailers seeking high-end shoes. Ethiopian shoe companies offer it allfine-dress, casual and sport footwear.

Between 2011 and 2012, Ethiopian shoe exports through the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) increased more than tenfoldfrom $630,000 to nearly $7 million.

Ahmad Milad Amiri enjoyed his job as finance officer at an Afghan information technology company. But he knew he could do better.

Business is thriving at Qalat’s only slaughterhouse and it is seen as a remarkable example of the southern Afghan city’s first public private partnership.

USAID-supported programs work with local entrepreneurs and invest in the small and medium enterprises that are the engines of sustainable job creation in Tunisia.

When Lashkar Gah municipality marked the graduation of 12 girls from high school, it was a first. The ceremony demonstrated the southern Afghan city’s support for empowering women in a region that has traditionally kept them at home. It marked the success of efforts by USAID’s Regional Afghan Municipalities Program for Urban Populations (RAMP UP) – South.

Farhad Ahmad, another member of the Afghan team, returned from the competition deeply impressed by the respect for diversity he observed in the US. “I had heard a lot of things about the US. Then I went there and saw that some things weren’t true; like that we could not find books about Islamic Law. [In fact] I was impressed with the collection [at Columbia University].”

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Last updated: August 08, 2016