Program Updates

Last updated: November 17, 2019

November 17, 2019

Zarifa Rezaee started her company selling homemade tomato paste, chutney, and pickles made with fresh ingredients from women farmers in her village. The company was doing well, so she employed seven additional women – all struggling with poverty and most either widows or students. Despite her early success, she faced cultural norms that created obstacles for businesswomen, especially women in rural areas. “From the outset I kept meeting with resistance toward women professionals,” Zarifa says, “but I fought every single battle along the way and never gave up.”

November 17, 2019

The USAID Capacity Building Activity Project (CBA) promotes civil society engagement with local government and oversight of education services. In July 2019, USAID-trained community education monitors (CEMs) in Kandahar Province inspected the construction of the Ghazi Mohammad Akbar Khan High School and determined that the contractor was using substandard construction materials and that the construction laborers had not been hired from the local village, as required by the construction contract. The CEMs raised the issue with the district education department and the district governor, whom responded by initiating an independent review of the construction work and establishing a joint committee of community elders and education monitors to oversee and assess the school construction work.

October 30, 2019

Apricot processors in Afghanistan are struggling for their share of an Afghan market saturated with imported apricot juices, jams, and fruit concentrates. To enhance competitiveness, Afghan agribusinesses need to improve their product quality, shelf life, and marketing approach. This depends less on state-of-the-art equipment as on processors’ essential skills, knowledge, and know-how.

October 30, 2019

The Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a viral disease transferred from animals to humans via infected ticks or animal blood, and then from human to human through body fluids. The fatality rate is more than 30 percent in Afghanistan where it spreads rapidly, as most villagers keep livestock in their living quarters and do not understand the related hazards.

October 21, 2019

Women in Afghanistan have limited access to education. Of the 3.7 million children out of school across the country, 60 percent are girls, according to the latest Survey of the Afghan People. Naraywal* was born in Kunar Province, but she moved to Nangarhar so she could attend a university as there were no higher education institutions in her home province.

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