Newsroom

June 23, 2016

Across all 12 Pacific island countries, USAID assistance focuses on climate change adaptation, greater disaster preparedness and providing relief when disasters do strike. In the Federated States of Micronesia and the Marshall Islands, we also assist in reconstruction from disasters. In Papua New Guinea, USAID supports biodiversity conservation and improved natural resource management, helps combat HIV/AIDS and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, and works to strengthen democracy, peace and security in the post-conflict Autonomous Region of Bougainville. Through our regional programming, we also support sustainable fisheries management and conservation.

Strengthening HIV/AIDS Services for Most-at-Risk Populations in Papua New Guinea
February 12, 2016

An alarmingly high prevalence of HIV in certain populations of Papua New Guinea (PNG) is impacting the nation’s ability to advance its economy and allow for lasting prosperity. In response to these issues, USAID is working to increase access to quality HIV prevention, care, and treatment services and mitigate the impact of the disease on these populations, their sexual partners, and their families.

Choiseul Integrated Climate Change Programme
February 12, 2016

To reduce the vulnerability of food security to the impacts of climate change, USAID and GIZ work with local communities to help establish nurseries that will supply tree species needed to implement forestry and agroforestry activities.

Coastal Community Adaptation Project
February 12, 2016

Through Coastal Community Adaptation Project (C-CAP), USAID supports local-level climate change interventions in nine Pacific Island countries:, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Papua New Guinea (PNG), Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu. In 77 communities in these countries, USAID is working to increase local knowledge and adaptive capacity through community-based training.

Pacific-American Climate Fund
January 12, 2016

Pacific Island countries are highly vulnerable to the negative effects of climate change. More than 8.5 million people across the region depend for their livelihood primarily on tourism, fisheries, forestry and agriculture, all of which are highly sensitive to rising sea levels, changing ocean temperatures and acidity, and shifting rainfall and storm patterns. Civil society organizations (CSOs), which play a critical role in the region’s social and economic development, are often hindered by a lack of resources and managerial capacity from responding to climate change challenges.

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Last updated: June 27, 2016

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