Fact Sheets

The April and May 2015 earthquakes in Nepal destroyed or significantly damaged over 755,000 homes, making housing the single largest reconstruction need and the Government of Nepal’s (GON) highest priority. USAID/Nepal is funding a number of complementary initiatives to help meet this need and support the GON’s owner-driven housing reconstruction efforts.

USAID’s commitment to Nepal has stood the test of time. In the aftermath of the devastating April 25 earthquake, our commitment remains stronger than ever. On June 25, 2015, the United States government announced $130 million to support Nepal’s earthquake relief and recovery needs. This contribution builds upon USAID’s investments on disaster preparedness, and is only the beginning of our contribution to Nepal’s earthquake recovery, which will span multiple years.

Guinea confirms seven EVD cases between March 17 and April 6. Liberia confirms three EVD cases since March 31; genetic sequencing identifies link to Guinea cluster. USG partners respond to new EVD cases in Guinea and Liberia. USAID/OFDA provides $3 million for community-level and integrated disease surveillance in Sierra Leone.

In line with our commitment to transparency, we are releasing our fourth set of data detailing USAID’s results for 2015.

Ongoing drought conditions prompted the Government of Ethiopia (GoE) to reclassify 443 woredas, or districts, to 219 priority one hotspot districts, 147 priority two hotspot districts, and 77 priority three hotspot districts. Priority one hotspot districts increased nearly 18 percent from the December 2015 figure of 186 districts.

Provide support to Libyans as they make important decisions about the structure, authority, power, and resources of their national and local governments and the treatment of and protections for their citizens. A key component of this project is to engage citizens, including marginalized groups, in the national dialogue to compile community perspectives and to build consensus on important issues that will influence the constitutional reform process, and lay the groundwork for a more engaged citizenry.

To strengthen citizen confidence in Libya’s elected government during a key political transition in the country. A primary component of this project is to increase public and stakeholder confidence in the integrity of elections as a vehicle for peacefully and democratically selecting leaders. Additionally, this program seeks to increase women’s and marginalized groups’ genuine inclusion and participation such that their views and interests are incorporated into Libyan governing and legislative processes.

The Asia/Middle East Economic Growth Best Practices (AMEG), Libya Public Financial Management Activity implements economic growth activities for USAID missions and operating units in Asia and the Middle East. The goal of the AMEG Libya Public Financial Management (PFM) project is to develop modern PFM systems in Libya. This  involves improved policies and processes, and institutional and human capacity-building at both the national and municipal levels. Modern PFM policies and processes will improve governance and the delivery of basic services to Libyans.

LWEE releases the untapped economic potential of women entrepreneurs and enables more women to contribute to Libya’s economic growth and political stability. LWEE economically empowers women through business training and access to financing, enabling them to participate in Libya’s formal economy. LWEE creates women-owned business associations for networking and builds more effective market linkages. LWEE enhances the role of women in the economy, increases stability within communities, and improves the livelihoods of women who have participated in the program. 

Pages

Last updated: August 21, 2017