Fact Sheets

Multiple consecutive seasons of below-normal rainfall—exacerbated by the effects of El Niño—have resulted in deteriorating agricultural, livestock, food security, and nutrition conditions in northeastern and central Ethiopia. By early 2016, the UN anticipates that 15 million people will require emergency food assistance and 350,000 children will need treatment for severe acute malnutrition (SAM); critical needs in drought-affected areas will also require humanitarian agricultural, health, and water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions.

The West Africa Trade and Investment Hub (Trade Hub), launched in March 2014, works in close coordination with a network of West African private sector partners and public institutions to reduce poverty, raise incomes, add jobs and increase food security by expanding trade through: Value-added exports (shea, cashews, mangoes, apparel) and Regional trade in key agricultural commodities, including staple grains (rice, millet/ sorghum, maize) and livestock (cattle, sheep, goats)

The Food Across Borders Program (ProFAB) grew out of the USAID-sponsored Food Across Borders Conference in January 2013. Participants agreed on a region-wide technical agenda, referred to as the Accra Agenda, which identified primary barriers to trade in staple agricultural commodities. Public and private sector representatives highlighted five central barriers: road harassment, export restrictions, rules of origin, clarity of sanitary/phyto-sanitary veterinary regulations, and taxation. Hub Rural and CILSS have played an important role in building the foundation for launching ProFAB as part of the Accra Agenda.

The April and May 2015 earthquakes in Nepal destroyed or significantly damaged over 755,000 homes, making housing the single largest reconstruction need and the Government of Nepal’s (GON) highest priority. USAID/Nepal is funding a number of complementary initiatives to help meet this need and support the GON’s owner-driven housing reconstruction efforts.

Working with the Government of India and Indian partners, the U.S. Government has invested close to $100 million to prevent and control TB in India, and has helped to treat over 15 million people over the last 18 years. The progress is real. Millions of lives have been saved, and we have seen dramatic improvements in diagnosis and care. But the challenge to end TB in India remains. Despite a strong national TB control program, TB continues to be a leading cause of death in India. The U.S. will remain a sustained, committed partner, supporting India along the path toward ending TB.

Since September 25, 2013 the U.S. Government has committed a total of $100 million in support of the High Impact Micro-Infrastructure Initiative (HIMII).

Since 2000, USAID has invested more than $300 million for hundreds of water and wastewater projects in the West Bank and Gaza.

USAID invests in Palestinian agriculture to boost the local economy, provide jobs, and transform agribusiness into a globally competitive industry.

In the West Bank, girls are succeeding in the classrooms and USAID is proud to be part of that success.

Over the next five years, USAID Promote is providing up to 75,000 educated women with the skills and support they need to excel in their chosen fields, become leaders in their communities and society, and maximize their contribution to Afghanistan’s continued development.

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Last updated: May 02, 2016