Fact Sheets

The Agency reported more than 360 active public-private partnerships with at least one private sector partner in 2015, with 107 new reported partnerships since 2014. These partnerships engaged more than 950 partners, including 753 private sector parters and 548 local partners. The partnerships spanned 93 countries and 9 development sectors.

The United States and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) have been partners for nearly 40 years, working together on shared goals of stability, prosperity, and peace in Southeast Asia.  Engagement with Southeast Asia, a strategically important, economically dynamic region at the heart of the Asia-Pacific, is a central pillar of the U.S. Rebalance to Asia.  The United States is committed to this strategic partnership which advances our shared interest in building and sustaining a rules-based order in the Asia-Pacific, one in which countries can pursue their objectives peacefully and in accordance with international law and norms.

The United States is a strong advocate for increased international cooperation and responsibility-sharing on irregular migration, refugee, and trafficking in persons issues in East Asia and the Pacific. At today’s East Asia Summit (EAS), the region’s leaders responded to President Obama’s call for strengthened cooperation by endorsing the EAS Leaders’ “Declaration on Strengthening Responses to Migrants in Crisis and Trafficking in Persons.”  To support this stronger focus on human trafficking and irregular migration challenges, President Obama announced USAID's comprehensive, five-year plan of action.  The plan commits nearly $12 million in the first year, including support for a new regional program which will strengthen cross-border collaboration between source, transit, and destination countries; leverage the private sector to reduce human trafficking in person in global food supply chains; and support improved research and data collection to ensure that interventions against trafficking in persons are targeted and effective.‎

U.S.-ASEAN Connect (“Connect”) is the U.S. Government’s strategic framework for economic engagement with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the ASEAN Member States.  Connect was announced by President Obama on February 15, 2016, at the historic U.S.-ASEAN special Leaders’ Summit in Sunnylands, California. Organized around four pillars – Business Connect, Energy Connect, Innovation Connect, and Policy Connect – the initiative provides strategic focus to ongoing and future U.S. economic activities in the region.  U.S.-ASEAN Connect brings together all the resources and expertise of the U.S. government and private sector to create a whole-of-U.S. approach to economic engagement in the region.  It reflects both the U.S. government and U.S. private sector’s desire to support ASEAN’s continued integration, including the success of the ASEAN Economic Community, and increased U.S.-ASEAN trade and investment.

A new Women’s Livelihood Bond will enable over half a million Southeast Asian women to access credit to improve their livelihoods. As the world's first bond that focuses on both financial and social returns, the Women's Livelihood Bond is backed by a loan guarantee from the U.S Agency for International Development's (USAID), in partnership with Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT). The bond, structured and managed by Impact Investment Exchange Asia (IIX), launched in September 2016.

Although substantial gains have been made in improving access to clean drinking water and sanitation facilities, Malawi still faces health issues in terms of water, sanitation, and hygiene. Poor practices surrounding transportation and storage of the water make waterborne illnesses, including cholera, common occurrences in Malawi.

Malaria is endemic in 95 percent of the country, with 98 percent of cases caused by the most severe form of the parasite. As a result, malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five in Malawi, and the Ministry of Health (MoH) estimates that malaria accounts for 34 percent of all outpatient visits and 40 percent of all hospital admissions among children under five. Overall, one out of every four hospital deaths is attributed to malaria.

Over the last two decades, Malawi has made gains in most health indicators and it is one of only a few countries to have achieved Millennium Development Goal 4 for child survival ahead of the target year.

Recent national and regional literacy tests have shown that Malawian students rank among the lowest in the sub-Saharan African region. In fact, in Malawi, 83% of Standard 1 students cannot read a single syllable and 92% cannot read a single word. Additionally, Standard 3 students on average can only read 11 words per minute and 67% cannot identify the first sound, or phoneme, in a word. This poses a major development challenge.

The Engineering Support Program (ESP) will assist the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) in providing architectural and engineering services to improve infrastructure related to energy, transportation, drinking water and sanitation, health, education, and agriculture.


Last updated: October 28, 2016