Macedonia Program Updates

Last updated: April 16, 2018

USAID Hosts Leadership Conference for the Youth of Macedonia
March 30, 2018

Today, March 30, 2018, USAID hosted a leadership conference on Macedonia’s Journey from Development to Self-Reliance, at MKC in Skopje. The half-day conference included inspirational talks by some of the best and brightest of Macedonia’s young talent, articulating their personal stories of success, and a panel discussion on “What does it take to be successful in Macedonia?”. The event wrapped up USAID’s commemoration of its 25 year anniversary in Macedonia.

Factoring Project
March 27, 2018

USAID’s Factoring project, in collaboration with the Economic Chamber of Macedonia, conducted the first conference on Factoring as a Financial Solution that Enables SMEs’ Growth at the Economic Chamber of Macedonia, Skopje.

HubIT Opening
March 7, 2018

Today, March 7, 2018, USAID’s Social Inclusion though Technology project (SIT) held its closing event and officially inaugurated HUBIT! — the first center in Macedonia and in the region that will offer services to youth with disabilities and help them prepare for careers in IT as well as provide services to companies to help them increase the accessibility of their services and products. HUBIT! was established through SIT and was awarded a grant from the European Union Smart Start Project.

AA Brock Bierman signing MoU with the Minister of Economy
February 23, 2018

Today, February 23, USAID’s Business Ecosystem Project and the Ministry of Economy of the Republic of Macedonia signed a memorandum of understanding on private sector engagement. The goal of the new partnership is to encourage and facilitate private sector investment in local economic development initiatives that will be beneficial to the companies making the investments, and the economy at large.The project and the Ministry will collaborate on a national campaign to stimulate private sector engagement in local economic development.

January 29, 2018

Press freedom is under threat in the Balkans. Political-economic interests have captured much of the mainstream media sector through opaque ownership structures, direct state support, and consolidated advertising markets, substantially limiting competition in the media marketplace and the public’s access to objective, balanced reporting.

Pages