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Transforming Lives

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Projects like LTCI help citizens receive necessary documentation for personal and business activities

Many citizens of the Kyrgyz Republic lack basic legal knowledge.  This question is especially acute in remote areas where there are few lawyers or legal advice services. As a result, citizens face a variety of challenges from registering their land and property rights to receiving basic identity documents such as passports and birth certificates. In some families this problem has been passed from generation to generation: if parents do not have passports, they cannot obtain birth certificates for their children, who later cannot receive passports of their own.  Another common issue is people who do not have official citizenship: many people still have Soviet Union passports, which are no longer valid, and thus they cannot access important basic services, receive state benefits or travel outside the country.

Patient Hakmiddin receives direct observation tuberculosis treatment

With MDR-TB a growing problem nationwide, Kyrgyzstan’s National TB Program (NTP) and the Ministry of Health (MoH), in collaboration with the USAID-funded TB CARE I project, led by the KNCV Tuberculosis Foundation, have joined forces to address this serious health challenge. National guidelines and protocols on MDR-TB, aligned with WHO recommendations, were developed and approved to facilitate an improved national treatment program. 

TB CARE I technical Specialist, Rais Mazitov, talks about the new outpatient TB treatment guidelines with former TB patient, Aiz

In Kyrgyzstan, where the prevention, detection and treatment of tuberculosis is a major public health concern, new methods of patient-centered care are being developed to combat the disease. With the support of the USAID-funded TB CARE I project, the Kyrgyz National TB Program has begun piloting full outpatient care, allowing TB patients to be treated without hospitalization. The pilot, currently involving 72 patients, is taking place in the urban setting of Bishkek, the country’s capital, with the treatment success rate 86%.

Health care workers learning to use infection control measures

Despite increased investment in tuberculosis (TB) prevention and treatment over the last decade, the National Tuberculosis Program (NTP) and policymakers in Kyrgyzstan were not directing sufficient attention to infection control (IC). The number of infections acquired by patients and health care workers in hospitals and other health care facilities was an indicator of the problem. In 2011 alone, 42 health care workers contracted TB and in 2012 the number of cases increased. Moreover, outdated regulations were contributing to delays in TB diagnosis and treatment. The seriousness of the situation finally forced Kyrgyz authorities to address long-overdue revisions to national IC policies and practices, with assistance from the USAID-funded TB CARE I project.

Nurjamal by the freshly baked bread

Thanks to the Women’s Peace Banks Project, the two women of different nationalities continue to work together and help build community trust demonstrating that ethnic Kyrgyz and Uzbeks can be good friends and work together supporting each other in everyday life. 

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Last updated: March 14, 2017

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