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March 12, 2020

The Kenya Crops and Dairy Market Systems Activity (KCDMS) is a five-year USAID program funded activity under Feed the Future, a U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative. The initiative’s goal is to help increase agricultural production and reduce poverty and malnutrition in Kenya. The KCDMS activity is being implemented in 12 counties and designed to spur competitive, resilient market systems in Kenya’s horticulture and dairy sectors.  Kenya is one of the fastest-growing economies in sub-Saharan Africa.

March 12, 2020

Feed the Future Kenya Agriculture Regulatory Capacity Building Program (FOODSCAP) is a three-year program implemented by the Kenya Plant Health Inspectorate Service (KEPHIS). It is funded as part of Feed the Future (FtF), the US government’s global hunger and food security initiative that helps to increase agricultural production and reduce poverty and malnutrition.

March 12, 2020

Access to water, adequate sanitation and hygiene (WASH) remain a significant challenge in Kenya. Currently, just over half of the Kenyan population has access to clean water, and only 16 percent has access to adequate sanitation and hygiene. The Government of Kenya has set an ambitious target of universal access to WASH by 2030. This will require greater financial resources to put in place the utilities and equipment needed to make this available for all Kenyans. The total investment needed to reach universal access by 2030 is estimated at $12.9 billion dollars.

March 10, 2020

The East Africa region has rich biodiversity and natural resources that transcend national boundaries. These include vast landscapes, iconic wildlife species, watersheds, arable lands, minerals etc. Broadly defined as natural capital, these resources are an important source of economic revenue and critical to East Africa’s economic growth. The region’s nature-based tourism industry, which is almost entirely dependent on wildlife and protected areas, contributes 7.5-10% of GDP to the region and supports local communities depending on the natural capital for their livelihoods. Wildlife contributes both economically and intrinsically to the region’s natural capital and is therefore a critical asset for East Africa’s future growth and sustainable development. Loss of habitats and species, the disruption of wildlife migratory, poaching, and wildlife trafficking are major threats in East Africa.

March 10, 2020

The Economics of Natural Capital in East Africa project supports USAID Kenya and East Africa and the East African Community’s (EAC) strategic priorities for harmonization of policy and legal frameworks, sustainable management of key transboundary ecosystems, anti‐poaching, and combating wildlife trafficking, and learning and leadership for biodiversity conservation. At the core of the Economics of Natural Capital in East Africa project is the understanding that a regional effort is needed to address national‐level problems that are exacerbating the decline in wildlife populations and habitat loss. This project has a strong focus on strengthening the EAC regional policy dialogue and the evidence base on transboundary natural resource management and biodiversity conservation.

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Last updated: May 21, 2020

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