Flag of Kenya

Newsroom

November 14, 2017

The value of Kenya’s high-elevation forests extends beyond their great beauty and geological diversity. The country depends on five major forest watersheds or “water towers” – Aberdares, Cherangani Hills, Mau Complex, Mt. Elgon and Mt. Kenya – for most of her water, energy and habitat that harbors rare and exotic species of plants and animals.

November 8, 2017

Engaging communities as partners in combating wildlife crime is critical. However, it has proven difficult to operationalize community engagement in a meaningful and sustainable manner. With some exceptions, the role of rural communities in combating wildlife crime in high value species and the conditions under which community engagement does and does not work have received little attention.

Tina Dooley-Jones, USAID Deputy Mission Director for Kenya and East Africa listens to one of the innovators as they share their achievements working under the program
October 19, 2017

The Kenya Innovation Engine (KIE), a USAID-funded program Feed the Future initiative, honored entrepreneurs, investors, counties, and farming cooperatives who have participated in bringing 24 agricultural innovations to more than 202,000 smallholder farmers in 35 counties in Kenya.

October 13, 2017

The Global Give Back Circle integrates mentoring, private sector investment and community support in a circle of empowerment that guides young disadvantaged teens to complete their educational journey, gain employable skills, and take on leadership roles as agents of change.  Participants receive scholarships, life-skills training and a dedicated mentor.  In return, the participants offer voluntary service to their communities while working with the next generation of scholarship awardees.

October 13, 2017

Wildlife crimes threaten the security, economy and biodiversity of East Africa. Demand for elephant ivory, rhino horn, and pangolin meat and scales continues to rise as poaching methods become increasingly sophisticated. International networks that poach, move and sell illegal wildlife products target wildlife populations across borders, creating a complex problem that transcends national boundaries. East Africa has emerged as a global hub for illegal wildlife trafficking and environmental crime in a black market that generates up to $213 billion each year.

Pages

Last updated: February 13, 2018

Share This Page