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Partnership for Food Security

Sharing and Transfering Agricultural Knowledge and Innovation

India is one of the world’s largest agricultural producers of staple crops, fruits, horticulture, and dairy. Many of India’s agricultural successes emerged from its ability to develop and apply innovative, cost-effective solutions to farming challenges, such as low-cost tractors, seed systems, and water management technologies. USAID/India’s food and nutritional security and adaptation programs focus on sharing and transferring these innovations globally, in partnership with the Government of India, civil society organizations, and the private sector to improve food security locally, regionally, and globally.

USAID/INDIA FOOD SECURITY PROGRAMS 

Sharing and Transfering Agricultural Knowledge and Innovation: Developing countries in Africa and Asia have similar conditions for agricultural development that exist in India. By applying frugal technological and institutional innovations, India emerged as a leader in agriculture production. To test, adapt, share and transfer these successful innovations outside of India, USAID/India is partnering with a diverse range of Indian and American private sector stakeholders to address development challenges in Feed the Future focus countries in Africa and Asia. For example, USAID works with the American non-profit iDE and agro-companies in India to develop supply chains in Nepal to reach poor, smallholder farmers, including women, with agro-inputs and technologies that enhance productivity. In Kenya and Malawai, we partnered with the American organization, Technoserve, to transfer innovative Indian soil and water management techniques that have helped local communities improve off-season crop production, provide water for their cattle, and explore options for growing additional fodder crops. In partnership with Infrastructure Leasing & Financial Services Limited (IL&FS)—India’s largest private sector infrastructure company—USAID transferred India’s successful smallholder dairy production and marketing business model to Kenya, while helping civil society organizations like Science for Society and Sristi to transfer their frugal agricultural innovations such as low-cost tractor, seeding equipment, fruit processing equipment and solar drier to Kenya and Bangladesh to ensure sustainability and scalability. 

Building Institutional and Human Resource Capacity: Institutional capacity is critical for developing countries in Asia and Africa to sustain agricultural development. USAID partnered with the Indian Ministry of Agriculture’s premier National Institute of Agricultural Extension Management (MANAGE) to train 1,500 agricultural practitioners (farmers, processors, extension workers, and policymakers) from 11 African and six Asian countries in specialized farming practices to improve productivity and income. The trained professionals are applying their new knowledge in their respective organizations to contribute in their existing agricultural development and food and nutrition security programs

Scaling Innovations to Build Resilience in India: In partnership with private companies, Indian government organizations and national and international agriculture research organizations, resilience building activities across India are being implemented to benefit vulnerable communities in the ecologically sensitive regions of India. USAID collaborated with India’s largest private sector organization on weather services to expand their network of “Automatic Weather Stations” across 31 districts in nine states of India, which makes existing weather data, risk mitigation tools, and crop insurance services more accessible to vulnerable farmers. USAID partnered with institutions from the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) global consortium to scale up  its successful approach on Smart Villages to enhance adaptation in agriculture in the relatively food insecure and vulnerable Indo-Gangetic Plains of India. USAID is also partnering with WorldFish, Government of the State of Odisha and private companies to increase the supply of and access to affordable, safe, nutrient-rich fish and fish products through innovative technologies and approaches. This will help communities in one of the most vulnerable ecologies in India through increased availability, accessibility and consumption of nutritious fish-based food products. The marketing approach through private sector engagement will be transferred to neighboring countries including Bangladesh and Nepal.Building Institutional and Human Resource Capacity: Institutional capacity is critical for developing countries in Asia and Africa to sustain agricultural development. USAID partnered with the Indian Ministry of Agriculture’s premier National Institute of Agricultural Extension Management (MANAGE) to train 1,500 agricultural practitioners (farmers, processors, extension workers, and policymakers) from 11 African and six Asian countries in specialized farming practices to improve productivity and income. The trained professionals are applying their new knowledge in their respective organizations to contribute in their existing agricultural development and food and nutrition security programs.

Results at a Glance

  • More than 760,000 farmers across India, Africa and Asia applied improved technologies and management practices.
  • More than 271,000 hectares of land were brought under improved technologies.
  • More than 23,600 individuals received short-term training.

 

Last updated: November 24, 2017

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