Flag of Haiti

Newsroom

September 1, 2014

The goal of the Smallholder Alliance for Sorghum in Haiti (SMASH) Program is to improve the incomes of up to 18,000 Haitian subsistence farmers through increased incomes and production of locally grown sorghum in place of imported wheat in the production of BRANA’s product, Malta H, a non-alcoholic nutritional beverage.

February 6, 2014

Agricultural productivity in Haiti has systematically declined in the last three decades.  A shift to annual cropping on steep slopes has caused erosion and exacerbated flooding that affects the slopes, as well as the productive plain areas.  The magnitude of flooding has increased, water supplies have become much more erratic, and both lives and livelihoods are under threat.  At the same time, ground water levels in the plains have dropped substantially due to growing urban demand, and water has become increasingly brackish as seawater replaces fresh water.

January 30, 2014

USAID’s Support to the National Food Security and Nutrition Program will directly support the Government of Haiti’s (GOH) social protection efforts to prevent hunger and malnutrition by implementing a safety net program that will build demand and improve access for locally-produced foods among vulnerable households.  Directly impacting approximately 18,150 households through the provision of food vouchers and 205,000 households through maternal and child health and nutrition interventions, the program will initially be implemented in five departments.  The four-year project will also work with the Government of Haiti’s Ministry of Social Affairs and Labor (MAST) to establish a national household level targeting database system.  

January 29, 2014

USAID awarded the “Avoid HIV and its Transmission” (EVIH-T) project to Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Communication Programs, who leads a consortium including JHPIEGO, Save the Children, and local non-governmental organizations such as INHSAC and FOSREF. 

January 29, 2014
The Haiti earthquake on January 12, 2010, struck and further weakened a health system with historically poor health outcomes.  This is particularly true for the public health facility infrastructure in Haiti, which, in addition to facilities destroyed or damaged in the earthquake, has serious infrastructure shortfalls throughout the health system such as: structures that are in poor condition or not seismically resilient, lack of clean water and adequate sanitation, and lack of availability of adequate power.
 

Pages

Last updated: August 08, 2016

Share This Page