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August 4, 2015

The success of the U.S. Government strategy in Haiti is predicated on a credible, legitimate counterpart in the Government of Haiti (GOH). Effective and representative institutions are essential to improve the quality of governance in Haiti, thereby bolstering stability and government legitimacy. USAID activities aim to strengthen GOH, political party, and civil society capacity to organize and monitor regular and inclusive elections that meet international standards for transparency and fairness. 

February 12, 2015

For more than five years, Feed the Future West/WINNER (FTF West/WINNER) has worked to identify opportunities to improve irrigation water access sustainably, while reducing the risk of floods and increasing agricultural productivity. At the Rivière Grise in the Cul-de-Sac corridor, FtF West/WINNER has constructed a water diversion structure to provide permanent water to up to 8,500 hectares of agricultural land, while limiting water levels to prevent flooding.

February 1, 2015

Innovative design coupled with sustainable trade practices can be used as a source of competitive advantage for artisans from developing nations. This is particularly true in the current climate of globalization and the declining value of traditional artisanal products.

January 28, 2015

Five years after the devastating 2010 earthquake, Haiti has transitioned to a period of long-term development. With the help of the international community, Haiti has made significant advances. The U.S. post-earthquake strategy for Haiti focuses on four sector pillars designed to catalyze economic growth and build long-term stability.

February 6, 2014

Agricultural productivity in Haiti has systematically declined in the last three decades.  A shift to annual cropping on steep slopes has caused erosion and exacerbated flooding that affects the slopes, as well as the productive plain areas.  The magnitude of flooding has increased, water supplies have become much more erratic, and both lives and livelihoods are under threat.  At the same time, ground water levels in the plains have dropped substantially due to growing urban demand, and water has become increasingly brackish as seawater replaces fresh water.

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Last updated: November 29, 2016

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