Flag of Haiti

Newsroom

August 20, 2015

Feed the Future Haïti Chanje Lavi Plantè (Improving Farmers’ Lives) builds on previous activities in Haiti’s fertile plains in order to increase productivity and to maximize available resources in the region. The project promotes agricultural intensification, sound natural resource management and a modern, post-harvest marketing system to ensure that products make it to market. Farmer organizations are a critical component to strengthening Haiti’s agriculture sector and are natural partners for Feed the Future Haiti. The project aims to strengthen farmer organizations’ operations, focusing on implementing modern, environmentally-friendly business practices through a value-chain focused approach.

January 28, 2015

Five years after the devastating 2010 earthquake, Haiti has transitioned to a period of long-term development. With the help of the international community, Haiti has made significant advances. The U.S. post-earthquake strategy for Haiti focuses on four sector pillars designed to catalyze economic growth and build long-term stability.

October 1, 2014

A healthy population directly contributes to Haiti’s stability, economic growth, and democracy. The SSQH-CS Project provides access to and increases utilization of primary healthcare services, including pre- and post-natal care; family planning; nutrition; HIV/AIDS; TB; immunizations; and water, sanitation, and hygiene, while emphasizing and improving the quality of those services. In order to advance its operations and healthcare services, SSQH-CS is harnessing the power of science and technology--integrating new financial tools for facility management and innovative mHealth (mobile health) applications to expand the network’s mobile data collection, health mentoring, and referral capabilities.

September 1, 2014

The goal of the Smallholder Alliance for Sorghum in Haiti (SMASH) Program is to improve the incomes of up to 18,000 Haitian subsistence farmers through increased incomes and production of locally grown sorghum in place of imported wheat in the production of BRANA’s product, Malta H, a non-alcoholic nutritional beverage.

September 1, 2014

Haiti’s private sector is an essential contributor to the country’s long-term economic development and vitality. The Haitian economy continues to be primarily driven by small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), which have the potential to be strong engines of economic growth and create thousands of new jobs.

February 6, 2014

Agricultural productivity in Haiti has systematically declined in the last three decades.  A shift to annual cropping on steep slopes has caused erosion and exacerbated flooding that affects the slopes, as well as the productive plain areas.  The magnitude of flooding has increased, water supplies have become much more erratic, and both lives and livelihoods are under threat.  At the same time, ground water levels in the plains have dropped substantially due to growing urban demand, and water has become increasingly brackish as seawater replaces fresh water.

Pages

Last updated: August 26, 2015

Share This Page