Fact Sheets

The Food Aid Reform proposal in the FY 2014 President’s Budget will reach more people in need by expanding the flexibility in our food assistance delivery while reducing average per person costs, addressing clear inefficiencies in P.L. 480 Title II (Title II), while allowing for the majority of emergency food aid to still be procured from the United States. This fact sheet details the total resources available for food aid under the reforms and how the reforms will allow USAID to reach more people and reduce the average cost per beneficiary. In addition, this fact sheet clarifies the overall International Disaster Assistance (IDA) request and explains how it is allocated between emergency food and non-food emergency needs.

In his State of the Union address, President Obama called upon our nation to join with the world in ending extreme poverty in the next two decades. Today, we have new tools and approaches that enable us to achieve a goal that would have been unimaginable even two decades ago: the elimination of extreme poverty and its most devastating corollaries, widespread hunger and preventable child and maternal deaths.

With just over one percent of the federal budget, the State Department and USAID budget advances U.S. national security, protects Americans at home and abroad, opens markets overseas, fights disease, hunger and extreme poverty, creates American jobs, forges global partnerships and delivers real results for the American people. The FY2014 budget request of $47.8 billion supports U.S. engagement in over 180 countries, and provides the people and programs necessary to protect U.S. interests, promote peace and ensure America’s leadership in the world.

The President’s FY 2014 budget request for the Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is $47.8 billion, a six percent decrease from FY 2012. The request makes tough trade-offs, proposes important reforms, and takes advantage of efficiencies to support our diplomatic, development, and national security priorities and use taxpayer dollars efficiently.

The Emerging Pandemic Threats (EPT) program strengthens capacities in developing countries to prevent, detect, and control infectious diseases in animals and people with an emphasis on early identification of, and response to, dangerous pathogens from animals before they can become significant threats to human health.

 

Grantee:  CERMES, University of the West Indies

Beneficiary Countries:  Barbados and OECS countries

Duration: 2 years (July 2011-December 2013)

Funding to date: $767,350

Objective:  To develop teaching and research related to Climate Change with an emphasis on cross-sectoral adaptation including short courses in climate change, to upgrade the Centre’s existing physical infrastructure to support the region. 

 

Grantees: The Secretariat of the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States; the University of the West Indies’ Center for Resource Management and Environmental Studies; the Caribbean Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology; the Government of Barbados.

Beneficiary Countries: Barbados, St. Kitts & Nevis, Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent & the Grenadines and Grenada.

Duration:  5 years (2011-2015).

Funding to date: $2.5 million

Total Projected investment:  $20 million.

 

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Last updated: June 17, 2013

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