Fighting Famine

Fighting Famine

Photo: AFP PHOTO /

Tens of millions of people are in need of humanitarian assistance as a result of man-made crises in South Sudan, Nigeria, and Yemen - all of which are driven by violent conflict - and Somalia, where ongoing conflict is compounding the effects of severe and prolonged drought. These crises are forcing people to flee within and beyond their country borders, disrupting agricultural production and livelihoods, and severing families from their social support systems. Ongoing violence - including deliberate attacks on civilians and relief workers - continues to prevent aid from reaching those most in need.

The United States is one of the largest donors of humanitarian assistance in all four crises. The assistance we provide includes: emergency food and nutrition assistance, safe drinking water, life-saving medical care, and shelter for those who have been displaced, both internally and as refugees, as well as protection for civilians. The United States is also supporting health, sanitation and hygiene services to help stop the spread of preventable disease - a leading cause of death during food crises.

Our assistance represents the best of America's generosity and goodwill, while improving our national security by strengthening relationships with nations and people around the world. We will continue to work with our international and local partners to provide the life-saving aid needed to avert famine and to support surrounding countries, mitigating the impact of these crises.

Last updated: January 19, 2018

July 11, 2017

Today we are joined by Mr. Robert Jenkins, Acting [corrected title] Assistant Administrator for the U.S. Agency for International Development's Bureau for Democracy, Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance. Mr. Jenkins will discuss U.S. humanitarian aid to fight famine in Nigeria, South Sudan, Somalia, and Yemen, and in particular, the recent announcement of an additional 639 million dollars in assistance for this effort. Mr. Jenkins is speaking to us from Washington, D.C. We will begin with remarks from Mr. Jenkins, and then we will open it up to your questions.

July 10, 2017

Dire food insecurity persists despite UN removal of Famine designation in Unity. Approximately 6 million people projected to be severely food insecure in July. US government (USG) announces $199 million in additional humanitarian assistance for the South Sudan response.

July 10, 2017

Famine Early Warning System (FEWS) NET expects persistent food security crisis through early 2018. USAID/OFDA staff assess health, nutrition, and water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) needs in northern Kenya. US Government (USG) announces nearly $126 million in new humanitarian assistance for Somalia and Somali refugees in the Horn of Africa region.

July 10, 2017

President Trump announces $122 million in additional humanitarian funding to support conflict-affected Nigerians. Government of Nigeria (GoN) and Government of the Republic of Cameroon (GRC) authorities facilitate transport of approximately 900 displaced Nigerians from Cameroon to Nigeria in late June. Armed actors attack civilians across the Lake Chad Basin, including Nigeria’s city of Maiduguri and Cameroon’s Mayo-Sava. Department

July 10, 2017

UN declares Yemen the largest cholera outbreak globally, with more than 297,400 new suspected cases and 1,706 related deaths as of July 7. The population in need of humanitarian assistance increased by nearly 2 million people between November 2016 and April 2017. USG announces nearly $192 million in new humanitarian funding to support critical relief efforts in Yemen.

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