EA Regional
December 6, 2017

East Africa’s economic growth is among the fastest in the world and its countries are becoming increasingly integrated and interdependent. USAID supports regional institutions, including the East African Community (EAC), the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), and their member states to address issues that require collaboration between countries.

December 4, 2017

As the responsibility for leadership passes to the next generation, Africa’s future and its global competitiveness will be driven by academically gifted and entrepreneurial young people empowered to lead.  USAID is providing state of the art education to millions of Kenyan children, expanding educational and employment opportunities for young adults, and preparing a new generation of young African leaders with the skills and mindset to transform the region and the continent.

November 16, 2017

The East African Community (EAC) is a regional intergovernmental organization of 6 partner states: the Republics of Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania, with its headquarters in Arusha, Tanzania. The EAC is home to over 150 million citizens and with a land area of 1.82 million square kilometres and a combined Gross Domestic Product of US$ 146 billion.

November 8, 2017

Engaging communities as partners in combating wildlife crime is critical. However, it has proven difficult to operationalize community engagement in a meaningful and sustainable manner. With some exceptions, the role of rural communities in combating wildlife crime in high value species and the conditions under which community engagement does and does not work have received little attention.

October 13, 2017

Wildlife crimes threaten the security, economy and biodiversity of East Africa. Demand for elephant ivory, rhino horn, and pangolin meat and scales continues to rise as poaching methods become increasingly sophisticated. International networks that poach, move and sell illegal wildlife products target wildlife populations across borders, creating a complex problem that transcends national boundaries. East Africa has emerged as a global hub for illegal wildlife trafficking and environmental crime in a black market that generates up to $213 billion each year.


Last updated: February 20, 2018

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