Ethiopia

Ethiopia Water
In Ethiopia, women and girls may have to walk hours or days to find clean drinking water for their households. USAID rehabilitates water points, supplying life-saving access to clean drinking water in a country where over 5 million people are in need.
Kelley Lynch

Latest Horn of Africa Fact Sheet

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Key Developments

USAID's Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA) is responding to the complex emergency in the Horn of Africa region, including in EthiopiaKenya, and Somalia.

Vulnerable populations in Somalia, southeastern Ethiopia, and northern Kenya continue to face life-threatening acute food insecurity, following delayed and erratic seasonal rains across the Horn of Africa, according to the USAID-funded Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET). As of early May, April-to-June gu rains had begun in parts of Somalia’s semiautonomous regions of Puntland and Somaliland, while Lower Juba, Lower Shabelle, and coastal areas of Galgadud and Mudug regions had not yet received rains, according to the UN. In addition, central and eastern Ethiopia remained dry due to below-average February-to-June belg rainfall, and the delayed onset of March-to- May long rains had exacerbated dry conditions in agricultural and pastoral areas of Kenya, according to FEWS NET.

Despite an unprecedented scale-up in donor contributions to address the humanitarian crisis and prevent Famine in Somalia, additional relief assistance is urgently needed due to the late onset of gu rains, increased malnutrition levels, and the ongoing cholera outbreak—all of which are compounded by humanitarian access constraints.

Through nearly $1.3 billion in ongoing FY 2016 and FY 2017 support from USAID’s Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance, USAID’s Office of Food for Peace, and U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, relief actors are responding to critical needs for emergency food, health, livelihoods, nutrition, protection, and water, sanitation, and hygiene assistance among internally displaced persons, host communities, and refugees affected by drought and conflict in the region.

Please visit our Horn of Africa web page for additional information.

Background

Following consecutive seasons of unfavorable rainfall and harvests in 2010 and 2011, Ethiopia experienced localized precipitation shortages during the February-to-May 2012 belg rainy season in 2012, which hindered recovery for populations that experienced significant food insecurity and malnutrition in 2011. Drought is a major contributor to vulnerability in Ethiopia, as resulting crop and livestock losses have a profoundly negative impact on the lives and livelihoods of farmers and pastoralists.

Populations continue to confront several other challenges—including seasonal flooding, localized inter-communal conflict, above-average food prices, disease outbreaks, and limited access to health and WASH services—that contributed to sustained humanitarian needs and an ongoing complex emergency in Ethiopia.

Last updated: May 11, 2017

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