Democratic Republic of the Congo

Cash-for-work programs supported by USAID/OFDA enable conflict-affected Congolese to earn income for themselves and their famili
Cash-for-work programs supported by USAID/OFDA enable conflict-affected Congolese to earn income for themselves and their families.
Kirsti Lattu/USAID

 

Key Developments

Ongoing violence continues to drive population displacement in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), with approximately 3.8 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) and more than 600,000 Congolese refugees and asylum seekers. More than one-third of IDPs in DRC—nearly 1.4 million people—are displaced within the Kasaï region, where recurrent clashes have exacerbated humanitarian needs.

The UN World Health Organization (WHO) reported more than 31,600 suspected cases of cholera and 629 related deaths in DRC between January and the end of September. The current case fatality rate (CFR) is approximately 2 percent—twice the WHO emergency threshold of 1 percent.

On September 16, Government of DRC security forces clashed with Burundian nationals who were protesting the recent expulsion of four Burundians from South Kivu Province’s Kamanyola town. The incident resulted in the deaths of at least 37 Burundians and injured more than 110 people, many of whom are likely refugees or asylum seekers, according to the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees.

Background

Despite the implementation of a peace agreement in 2003, ongoing fighting between forces loyal to the Government of the DRC and various armed entities—including the Allied Democratic Forces, the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda, and Mai-Mai militants—has contributed to high levels of insecurity and population displacement in eastern DRC. In addition, intensified fighting between the Armed Forces of DRC and local militia in central DRC’s Kasaï region since August 2016 has generated new humanitarian needs in the country. Humanitarian access constraints, poor infrastructure, forced recruitment into armed groups, reduced access to agricultural land and traditional markets, and violence have contributed to the deterioration of humanitarian conditions in DRC and mass internal displacement and refugee outflows since 2016.

Related Sectors of Work 

Last updated: October 16, 2017

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