Annual Reports

USAID achieves multiple conservation and development objectives through programs that protect biodiversity in forests and other ecosystems, maintain or increase carbon stocks in forests, and restore forests lost or damaged by poor management or land conversion. An annual report for Congress and the broader public summarizes Agency biodiversity and forestry results from the prior year and funding plans during the publication year.

USAID’s Biodiversity Conservation and Forestry Programs
FY 2016 Results and Funding (5MB PDF)
Published January 2018

SUMMARY: USAID works to protect nature and natural resources in service of security, global prosperity and self-reliance. Our forestry and biodiversity conservation programs help secure the livelihoods of some of the most vulnerable communities in the world, while conserving wildlife, biodiversity, and our shared global heritage.

In FY 2016, USAID field conservation programs improved natural resource management in highly biodiverse areas across more than 57 million hectares, an area about the size of Colorado and Nevada combined. As a result of USAID assistance, more than 1.5 million people have more income, better jobs, and other economic gains through sustainable natural resource management and biodiversity conservation. Millions more benefit indirectly from biodiversity and the natural services it provides. Results from USAID funding around the world appear in this report. A selection of notable results and three in-depth project profiles serve to illustrate major approaches used by USAID and its partners. 

In fiscal year 2016, the Agency invested $265 million toward biodiversity conservation programs in 57 countries, with approximately 56 percent of funds going to the 12 highest priority countries and regions identified in USAID’s Biodiversity Policy.  USAID invested $71.4 million in FY 2016 funds to address wildlife crime around the world. USAID and its partners work on a comprehensive strategy to strengthen law enforcement from parks to ports, reduce consumer demand for illegal wildlife products, and build international cooperation and partnerships.  USAID forestry programming totaled $161 million in about 40 countries, almost entirely focused on tropical forests.

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Last updated: February 23, 2018

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