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August 30, 2015

Description of Requirements

The United States Government, represented by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), invites qualified companies/individuals to submit a technical and cost proposal for services specified below. This is to support the USAID Regional Development Mission Asia operations in Bangkok, Thailand.

Questions regarding this Request for Quotation (RFQ) and quotation submissions must be via email only to spoomtong@usaid.gov by the time/date specified above.

The award of a contract hereunder is subject to the availability of funds. Issuance of this RFQ does not constitute an award or commitment on the part of the U.S. Government, nor does it commit the U.S. Government to pay for costs incurred in the preparation and submission of a quotation.

August 29, 2015

The United States has a government-wide strategy to combat wildlife trafficking to protect endangered species such as elephants, pangolins, rhinos, sharks, tigers, tuna and turtles. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has been actively working to stop the illegal trade in wildlife in Asia since 2005 when the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Wildlife Enforcement Network (ASEAN-WEN) was created. USAID has built on ASEAN-WEN's successes and is sharing its lessons with China and South Asia through Asia’s Regional Response to Endangered Species Trafficking program. The program addresses trafficking in illegal wildlife in Asia by reducing consumer demand, strengthening law enforcement and improving regional cooperation and anti-trafficking networks.

August 27, 2015

The U.S. Agency for International Development’s Low Emissions Asian Development program works with regional governments, businesses and institutions toward sustainable, low-carbon economic development, or “green growth,” across all economic sectors. The five-year program promotes regional cooperation to develop and implement low emission development strategies, improve greenhouse gas inventories and advance carbon markets in 12 countries: Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam.

August 27, 2015

The U.S. Agency for International Development’s Low Emissions Asian Development program works with regional governments, businesses and institutions toward sustainable, low-carbon economic development, or “green growth,” across all economic sectors. The five-year program promotes regional cooperation to develop and implement low emission development strategies, improve greenhouse gas inventories and advance carbon markets in 11 countries: Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam.

August 26, 2015

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Regional Development Mission for Asia has worked to stop the illegal trade in wildlife in Asia ever since the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Wildlife Enforcement Network (ASEAN-WEN) was formed in 2005. The U.S assistance demonstrates strong public commitment for reducing one of the largest threats to biodiversity in Asia. At current rates of illegal wildlife trading, up to 40 percent of Asian wildlife species could be lost in this century.

Unsustainable wildlife trade also degrades the health of ecosystems, human health, governance structures and economies. As Asia develops and regional connectivity increases, so does the need for protection of the region’s natural resources. In response to these threats, USAID oversees two flagship regional biodiversity programs: Asia’s Regional Response to Endangered Species Trafficking and the USAID Oceans and Fisheries Partnership.

ASIA’S REGIONAL RESPONSE TO ENDANGERED SPECIES TRAFFICKING PROGRAM

USAID has built on ASEAN-WEN's successes and is sharing its lessons with China and South Asia through Asia’s Regional Response to Endangered Species Trafficking program. It addresses trafficking in illegal wildlife in Asia by reducing consumer demand, strengthening law enforcement and improving regional cooperation and anti-trafficking networks.

The program draws together efforts of ASEAN member states, China and South Asia, non-governmental organizations, and private sector organizations to respond to the challenge of protecting its unique wildlife and natural resources. Program activities range from training airlines and airports training staff to spot trafficked wildlife to encouraging resorts and restaurants to stop serving shark fin soup.

To date, the network has trained more than 8,000 officials in anti-poaching operations and wildlife crime investigations. Other results include a ten-fold increase in arrests and seizures of illegal wildlife since 2009, a fully functioning secretariat set up in Bangkok and a national task force to combat wildlife crime formed in almost every ASEAN country.

THE OCEANS AND FISHERIES PARTNERSHIP

The Oceans and Fisheries Partnership between the United States Agency for International Development, the “Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center” and the “Coral Triangle Initiative for Coral Reefs, Fisheries and Food Security” works to strengthen regional cooperation to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, promote sustainable fisheries and conserve marine biodiversity in the Asia-Pacific region. Southeast Asia houses some of the world’s most productive and biodiverse marine ecosystems. These ecosystems provide food and income to over 200 million people in the region; however, unsustainable fishing practices threaten biodiversity, food security and livelihoods. The Oceans and Fisheries Partnership supports the development of a transparent and financially sustainable catch documentation and traceability system to help ensure that fisheries resources are legally caught and properly labeled.

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Last updated: November 24, 2015

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