Flag of Afghanistan

Transforming Lives

A telecommunications company employee checks with a customs official on release of his imports.

Imports of expensive, high-tech equipment and large boxes of pre-paid phone cards by Afghanistan’s five major telecommunications companies account for half of all customs duties collected at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul. Until recently, paying duties on those imports presented a huge security risk.

AMRAN facilitates training programs in construction and plumbing to experienced Afghan private sector employees and job seekers.

When 21-year-old Mokhtar Muhibi of Kabul began work as an unskilled plumber in 2010, the married father of two was scraping by on about $200 a month. He needed to improve his skills to support his family, which includes a younger brother still in school as well as his unemployed mother and father.

Sail Food Company workers use the new packing machines

Before the Sail Food Co. started to produce and sell Afghanistan’s favorite puffed potato snack, kurkure, in 2010, the snack was imported from Pakistan. But the company’s owner, Sherin Jan, knew there was potential for growth and expansion to other products.

Mohammad Saber prints off in large-format using the new digital printer

When Mohammad Saber and Mohammad Asif started Zarnegar, a printing press in Mazari Sharif, it was boom time in the capital of northern Afghanistan’s Balkh province. It was 1999 and Mazari Sharif was rapidly becoming one of Afghanistan’s more important economic hubs. Posters and billboards dotted the city, proof of a flourishing advertising industry.

Manizha Wafeq at her store in downtown Kabul.

When Sania and Manizha Wafeq noticed that women in Kabul were becoming more fashion conscious and that they had more disposable income, the sisters set up a clothes company to cater to the trend.


Last updated: October 06, 2015

Share This Page