Corn Soy Blend/Plus Commodity Fact Sheet

WBSCM Material Description and Number

CORN-SOY BLEND BAG-25 KG    100539
CORN-SOY BLEND BAG-HP-25 KG    100538
CORN-SOY BLEND PLUS BAG-HP-25 KG    110200
CORN-SOY BLEND, INSTANT BAG-25 KG    110206
CORN-SOY BLEND, INSTANT BAG-HP-25 KG    110197

General Information

Corn soy blends (CSB) are fortified blended foods (FBF) used extensively by USAID implementing partners, including the World Food Program (WFP). Local variations of CSB products and other FBFs are used as complementary foods throughout the world. Various formulations of corn soy-based and wheat soy-based FBFs have been used in food aid for almost 50 years, evolving with the advances in scientific evidence of their nutritional value and impact. USAID continues to refine CSB specifications to better meet the nutritional needs of beneficiaries and food assistance program priorities. 

Currently, both FFP and WFP are engaged in field research on the most efficacious and cost-effective formulations of CSB in order to prevent wasting, growth faltering and to treat moderate malnutrition. While this field research takes place, FFP is transitioning to an improved formulation of CSB, by using CSB Plus that has been formulated by WFP to correspond to World Health Organization guidance for the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition1.

CSB Plus is a cooked blend of milled, heat-treated corn and soybeans and fortified with a vitamin and mineral premix. The ingredients are partially cooked through wet or dry extrusion or roasting. CSB Plus is processed under conditions that permit improvements in the digestibility of starches and protein and in particular the de-activation of trypsin inhibitors in soy.

CSB Plus is packaged in high-performance 25-kilogram Pinch Bottom Open Mouth (PBOM) style multiwall paper bags with a linear low-density polyethylene film liner. CSB Plus has a shelf life of 18 months at 80 degrees Fahrenheit and is meant to retain the micronutrient content for at least 12 months in the field. For full product specifications refer to the most up to date USDA Commodity Requirements Document. The appropriate Web Based Supply Chain Management (WBSCM) code should be used to order CSB Plus based on program needs.

Programming Guidance

Summary: In USAID programming, CSB Plus should be programmed with Vitamin A and D fortified vegetable oil to increase nutrient values and caloric density. CSB Plus is provided as a fortified supplement to traditional complementary foods for children 6-24 months and to pregnant and lactating women (PLW) in Maternal and Child Health Programs to prevent nutritional deficiencies, address wasting, and promote child growth (prevent stunting) during the first 1,000 days and for treatment of children 6-59 months who are moderately malnourished.

For information on WFP programming of CSB Plus please refer to WFP's website: (http://www.wfp.org/nutrition/special-nutritional-products).

CSB Plus programmed with Vitamin A and D fortified vegetable oil may be used in USAID emergency and development programs as illustrated by the 2011 Food Aid Quality Review (FAQR) report decision trees:

Emergencies:

  • CSB Plus may be programmed in the second phase of emergency food distribution as an alternative to a ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF) for children under two (U2s). It is programmed with grain, oil, and a pulse as part of general food distribution.
  • CSB Plus with fortified oil maybe used as a supplement in blanket supplementary feeding programs, for infants and young children between 6-23 months, as an alternative to RUSF, where the prevalence of wasting is greater than 15 percent or 10 to 14 percent with aggravating factors. CSB Plus may also be used in targeted supplementary feeding programs for treatment of children under five (U5s) who are moderately malnourished as an alternative to RUSF where the prevalence of wasting is 10 to 14 percent or 5 to 9 percent with aggravating factors.

Development:

  • CSB Plus with oil may be provided after screening in targeted feeding programs as an alternative to RUSF to address wasting in adults and children with HIV or Tuberculosis (TB), treat moderate acute malnutrition (MAM)2 (wasting) and to promote growth and prevent faltering in PLWs and U5s.
  • CSB Plus with oil may be provided in general feeding programs to U5s as an alternative to RUSF to reduce seasonal peaks in wasting. It is also provided to PLWs and children 6-24 months to prevent acute malnutrition (SAM and MAM) and is used as a fortified supplement to local complementary foods in programs that aim to prevent chronic malnutrition3  (“1000 days approach”).

Nutrition/Preparation Information

CSB Plus is a complete protein and a good source of energy, carbohydrates, protein, fat and micronutrients for target groups. It is fortified with a variety of vitamins and minerals, including Vitamin A, Vitamin D3, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, B vitamins, Vitamin C, Biotin, Iodine, Iron as ferrous fumarate (and in the new formulations, with iron EDTA, which is a more bio-available form of iron), Zinc, Potassium, Calcium and Phosphorus per USDA requirements. CSB Plus is formulated to meet the WHO guidance for supplementary foods for children 6-59 months suffering from MAM.  

CSB Plus may be consumed on its own as a porridge or gruel. To prepare, mix one part CSB Plus with approximately 3 parts potable water, plus Vitamin A and D fortified vegetable oil and boil for 5 to 10 minutes. CSB Plus may also replace other fortified flours/meals and grains in recipes and improve their nutritional quality. Recipes are available from the North American Millers’ Association: (http://www.namamillers.org/issues/food-aid/food-aid-recipes/).

Nutritional Content

The total target nutritional values provided in the table below are for the finished product, which consists of yellow corn, soybeans, and micronutrient premix. The micronutrient values are target levels for vitamins and minerals. The values in the table were calculated using the average intrinsic values from the USDA National Nutrient Database data for: Corn, yellow: (http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/), Soybeans, mature seeds, raw: (http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/), and the USDA CSBP2 Corn Soy Blend Plus for use in Export Programs Commodity Requirements Document.

 

1 WHO. Technical note: supplementary foods for the management of moderate acute malnutrition in infants and children 6-59 months of age. Geneva, World Health Organization, July, 2012.

2 The World Health Organization (WHO) defines Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM) as a weight-for-height between -3 and -2 z-scores below the median of the WHO child growth standards without edema: (http://www.who.int/elena/titles/food_children_mam/en/index.html). Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) is defined by a very low weight for height (below -3 z-scores of the median WHO growth standards): (http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/severe_malnutrition/en/index.html)

3 Chronic malnutrition is also referred to as stunting. WHO defines stunting as having a height (or length)-for-age more than two standard deviations below the median of the WHO child growth standards: (http://www.who.int/childgrowth/en/)

 

Corn Soy Blend Plus

Nutrient

Target Premix per 100g

Total Target per 100g (Premix+ Intrinsic)

Moisture (max)

0.0

10%

Energy (min)

0.0

380 kcal

Protein (min)

0.0

14% (13.3g)

Carbohydrate (g)

0.0

64.30

Fiber, total dietary (g)

0.0

5.00

Crude Fiber (max)

0.0

5%

Total Lipid (min)

0.0

6% (2.5g)

Minerals

 

 

Iodine (µg)

40.00

40.00

Iron (total mg)

6.50

11.77

Iron (mg) (in the form of ferrous fumerate)

 

4.00

4.00

Iron (mg) (in the form of Iron-sodium EDTA)

 

2.50

2.50

Zinc (mg)

5.00

7.71

Potassium (mg)

140.00

724.00

Calcium (mg)

452.00

512.00

Phosphorous (mg)

290.00

596.00

Biotin (µg)

8.20

8.20

Vitamins

 

 

Vitamin A RE (IU)

3460

3632

Vitamin D3 (IU)

441.61

441.61

Vitamin E TE (mg)

8.30

8.85

Vitamin K1 (µg)

30.00

39.60

Vitamin B1 (mg)

0.20

0.68

Vitamin B2 (mg)

1.4

1.73

Vitamin B6 (mg)

1.00

1.56

Vitamin C (mg)

90.00

91.20

Pantothenic acid (mg)

1.60

2.18

Folic acid (as Dietary Folate Equivalents) (µg)

110.00

200.00

Niacin (mg)

8.00

11.18

Vitamin B12 (µg)

2.00

2.00

 

Sources for Table

United States Department of Agriculture. 2013. USDA Commodity Requirements. CSBP2 Corn Soy Blend Plus for use in Export Programs. Washington, DC. Retrieved 3/19/13: http://www.fsa.usda.gov/Internet/FSA_File/csbp2.pdf

United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2012. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 25. Corn, Yellow. Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page. Retrieved on 3/19/13 from USDA: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/

United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service.2012. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 25. Soy Beans, Mature seeds, Raw. Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page. Retrieved on 3/19/13 from USDA: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/


USDA Commodity Requirements Document

Corn Soy Blend - http://www.fsa.usda.gov/Internet/FSA_File/csb13.pdf
Corn Soy Blend Plus - http://www.fsa.usda.gov/Internet/FSA_File/csbp2.pdf
Instant Corn Soy Blend - http://www.fsa.usda.gov/Internet/FSA_File/icsb1.pdf

Shelf Life/Best if Used By Date (BUBD)

  • Shelf life - not available  
  • BUBD - 18 months after packaging (CSB and CSB+ only)

Sources

United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service.2008. USDA Commodity Requirements CSB13 Corn Soy-Blend for use in Export Programs. Retrieved on September 4, 2012 from: http://www.fsa.usda.gov/Internet/FSA_File/csb13.pdf

United States Department of Agriculture, Farm Services Agency. USDA Commodity Requirements. CSBP1 Corn Soy Blend Plus for Use in Export Programs. January 2013. http://www.fsa.usda.gov/Internet/FSA_File/csbp2.pdf

United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2011. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 25. Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page. Retrieved 3/19/13 from: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/

Webb, P., B. Rogers, I. Rosenberg, N. Schlossman, C. Wanke, J. Bagriansky, K. Sadler, Q. Johnson, J. Tilahun, A. Reese Masterson, A. Narayan. 2011. Delivering Improved Nutrition: Recommendations for Changes to U.S. Food Aid Products and Programming.  Retrieved 9/16/12 from: http://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PNADZ842.pdf

World Food Program (WFP). Nutrition, HIV and AIDS Programme Design Series. 2012. Programming for Nutrition. Rome. 

World Health Organization (WHO). 2012. Moderate Acute Malnutrition. Retrieved on September 7, 2012 from: http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/moderate_malnutrition/en/index.html

World Health Organization (WHO). 2012. Severe Acute Malnutrition. Retrieved on September 7, 2012 from: http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/severe_malnutrition/en/index.html

 

Last updated: June 21, 2013

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