Traditional Weaving Becomes Profitable

You see my own equipment, except the new loom, is over 30 years old. If I weave a patu for the market, I will do it all in one d
You see my own equipment, except the new loom, is over 30 years old. If I weave a patu for the market, I will do it all in one day. But if I make a patu for the village, for a wedding or celebration, then two days. It is a beautiful gift for the wedding.
Matt Herrick
USAID helps Afghan weavers generate income from skills developed over the years
1 DECEMBER 2003 | SHAMALI PLAINS
 
USAID’s income-generating program provided Aliachmad with the necessary tools—yarn and a refurbished loom—to reestablish his reputation in the village as the patu expert. Aliachmad have a lifetime’s worth of skill, but lack materials and start-up cash.
 
USAID helped to provide materials to 40 families with another 140 families, particularly women, receiving embroidering equipment such as wool and sewing machines. For the 40 patu families, weaving accounts for nearly half of their income while embroidery garners 30 to 40 percent of a family’s income. 

Last updated: January 06, 2014

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