School Shelters Girls

The surrounding wall has immensely secured the learning environment for girls in Seya Dara Sufla Village.
The surrounding wall has immensely secured the learning environment for girls in Seya Dara Sufla Village.
USAID/CBSG
The USAID-funded wall project improved connectivity between a remote village and the Afghan government
7 DECEMBER 2011 | BAMYAN, AFGHANISTAN
 
As a result of the project, the community had a chance to cooperate with their local government and feels comfortable discussing their grievances with them in the future.
 
Seya Dara Sufla is a remote village in Yakawlang District of Bamiyan Province. It is located approximately 35 km from the district center and 135 km from the provincial capital.
 
Sari Ulom Siya Dara, the village’s high school for girls, is located on the main road and next to the Sari Dara River. Due to heavy rains and rockslides, the school flooded on a regular basis, affecting community morale and school attendance.
 
To prevent flooding and rock slides, the community requested funding from USAID to build a retaining wall around the school, in coordination with the District Department of Education. Before project implementation, the village’s remote location made it difficult for the local government to meet with the community to discuss their grievances.
 
During the closing ceremony in September 2011, the school principal said, “The project has secured the safety of the female teachers and students and inspired parents to send their daughters to school. We appreciate the initiative that improved the educational environment for us in this remote part of Bamyan Province.”
 
The project has benefited approximately 12,500 people in the community by providing a secure learning environment for girls.
 
USAID facilitates partnerships between community-based organizations, traditional leadership, and the Afghan Government to identify sources of instability and address community grievances through small-scale community level projects in 14 provinces in the northern, western, and central regions.

Last updated: January 03, 2014

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