Mobile Health Clinic Visits Bedouin Communities

A Bedouin mother listens to a social worker explain women’s right to share in decisions on birth control.
A Bedouin mother listens to a social worker explain women’s right to share in decisions on birth control.
Photo: Tamkeen Project
Villagers Learn That Keeping a Family Healthy Depends on More Than Just Medicine
“When we talk to them about their rights while providing basic services, they are very receptive to the idea. Our frequent visits build bridges of trust that will yield more civic education opportunities in the future.” --Nour Abdallah, civic education facilitator

USAID helps more than seventy local West Bank civic organizations survive, grow, and educate vast numbers of Palestinians - particularly marginalized groups like children, youth, women, and the poor - on human rights, the rule of law, and other aspects of democratic political systems.

By and large, Bedouin populations lack access to health and education services. In addition, they have little knowledge of civics making it difficult to engage them on democratic issues. USAID sponsors a mobile clinic, serving more than 5,500 people at fifty Bedouin camps in the Jericho area of the West Bank, in which doctors, nurses, and social workers reach isolated communities and provide basic health services combined with civic education.

The team visits camps three days a week over the duration of a year. During their visits to the camp, the mobile unit team provides health and civic education, medical testing, blood testing, training in first aid techniques, and social support services.

“When we talk to them about their rights while providing basic services, they are very receptive to the ideas,” civic education facilitator Abdallah explains. “Our frequent visits build bridges of trust that will yield more civic education opportunities in the future.”

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Last updated: August 22, 2013

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