Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

For 20-year-old Chaltu Wata and 22-year old Aster Roba, life is anything but easy. The cousins have spent the past several years in a rural area where they initially faced resistance from the local community for trying to teach them healthier ways. They biked or walked for miles each day to visit individual households in order to teach them about sanitation, malaria, immunization, family planning, and the importance of delivering babies at a health facility. Even though they had been born and raised in this area, people from their community often rebuffed or snubbed them.

For five days beginning on September 17, 2012, approximately 500 scouts from two city administrations and the nine different regions of Ethiopia gathered at the Defense Engineering College in Debre Zeit for the 4th Ethiopian National Scout Jamboree. This is the first jamboree (an international term used to describe a large gathering of scouts) since 1966!

Malaria is a major public health problem in Ethiopia, with 75 percent of the over 80 million inhabitants at risk for malaria epidemics. Although significant progress has been observed in scaling up malaria control interventions over the past few years, limited efforts have been invested in using research results to inform national malaria policy and the implementation of malaria control. Currently, considerable malaria research is being conducted by in-country stakeholders, including the Government of Ethiopia (e.g.

Accurately quantifying antimalarial commodity requirements in Ethiopia is a challenge for multiple reasons. Transmission of malaria is highly variable and characterized by frequent and often large-scale epidemics. In addition, both artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have a short shelf life. At the district level, poor quantification has often resulted in either an over-supply of antimalarial drugs and diagnostic kits and their subsequent expiry, or shortages and stockouts of these commodities.

PMI/Ethiopia, in close collaboration with the Federal Ministry of Health, the Ethiopian Health Nutrition Research Institute, and the Oromia Regional Health Bureau, has been implementing malaria laboratory diagnosis and monitoring activities for the last three years. This has included developing guidelines and training materials for malaria laboratory diagnosis, training clinical and laboratory health professionals in malaria laboratory diagnosis, and supporting quality assurance/quality control systems.

In October 2012, a dozen ONE Moms visited Ethiopia. During their visit, the moms visited many sites including farms, schools and health clinics sponsored by a number of governmental, international and non profit organizations that are having a transformational impact on the lives of  women, their families and their communities.  

Most Americans have plenty of water to drink, bathe and flush the toilet, wash clothes and cars, water the lawn and fill the community pool. Even when tap water is safe to drink we often buy bottled water. Competition for oil, alternatives to fossil fuel, and the price of gasoline may be foremost on our mind. But competition for water may in fact be a greater challenge in the 21st century. As developing nations turn to hydro and solar power to fuel their energy and electric power needs, water will be the “new oil” for many nations around the world.

With the click of a mouse, the final versions of maps outlining conservation areas have set the precedent for a new kind of land management in Ethiopia. The maps show authorized land use for six Community Conservation Areas (CCAs) in Ethiopia’s Central and Southern Rift Valley— the first such areas to be officially recognized by the state. The final keystroke capped more than five years of work by the Ethiopian Sustainable Tourism Alliance, a U.S. Agency for International Development-supported program implemented by Counterpart International. The alliance aims to enhance biodiversity conservation and economic development through sustainable tourism, community mobilization and improved livelihoods throughout the region.

10 SEPTEMBER 2012 | KANDAHAR, AFGHANISTAN
 
Abdul Ahmad, 15, was in a car with a friend when they were stopped at a police checkpoint. The police arrested them thinking they belonged to the Taliban. Though Abdul continued to insist he never had any dealings with the Taliban, he was sent to a crowded juvenile detention facility in Kandahar City.
 

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Last updated: October 08, 2014