Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

July 2014—In December 2009, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) killed 321 civilians and abducted more than 250, including 80 children, in a massacre in Makambo, an isolated village deep in the forested area of northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). It was one of the worst massacres in the LRA’s 23-year history. However, news of the event took three weeks to reach the outside world.

July 2014—Salonga National Park, located in the center of the Democratic Republic of Congo, is home to the endangered bonobo, one of the closest relatives to humans. This national park, in the heart of the Salonga landscape, is a World Heritage Site and home to significant populations of forest elephants, bongos, pangolins, Congo peacocks and hippopotami.

USAID partners with the World Wildlife Fund and the Zoological Society of Milwaukee to collect patrol data and wildlife surveys within the park.

Khrystyna Brzak, 16, is a student at Ukraine’s Kyiv Secondary School #221. As a child, she dreamed of entering the art academy and becoming an artist. Since taking the USAID Financial Literacy Course last year, however, her dreams have changed. She now wants to study finance.

After years of political instability in Côte d’Ivoire, citizens want to strengthen linkages between their communities' prioritized needs and the government’s ability to deliver services.

Aug. 2014—Efficient customer service is critical to success for Pakistan’s power utilities. These utilities bear responsibility to provide continuous, accurate and reliable service to their customers.

The large number of old pending cases is a major challenge facing Serbia’s courts. Faster court proceedings and improved efficiency of the judicial system depend on several factors, most importantly, good case management and communication.

Many teenagers around the world are in high school, preparing to leave for college. But Dastan Umetbai Uulu, a 17-year-old journalist from Kyrgyzstan, is completing his 16th story in the past few years. He is a product of his own determination and the skills provided by a USAID project.

Curtailing Kyrgyzstan’s school racketeering culture is not a simple task—myriad forces work against progress. Some insist that the education system reflects problems within Kyrgyz society at large, including ethnic conflicts, civil unrest and powerful organized crime syndicates. 

July 2014—Maria Paula Santamaría died for reasons that were entirely preventable. When she needed urgent medical attention, she was turned away from a hospital in her hometown of Cali, Colombia, because she was transgender or “trans.” Santamaría was assigned male at birth, but identified as a woman. The hospital refused to serve her, discriminating against her because she did not fit society’s definition of gender.

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Last updated: August 25, 2014