Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

23 SEPTEMBER 2010 | MANDRAWOR VILLAGE, LAGHMAN PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN
 
In Eastern Afghanistan’s Laghman Province, women have few opportunities to work outside of the home or go to school.  However, carpet weaving has emerged as a way for women to earn income and support their families.
 
23 SEPTEMBER 2010 | TAKHTA PUL, KANDAHAR PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN
 
Like many Afghans, Ahmad Jan has the support of a large family unit bound by strong traditions.  He cultivates a six-hectare plot of land in Takhta Pul located in Kandahar Province with his 11 children and another 20 family members.  Although this land has been with the family through three decades of war, its ouput has never enabled them to do more than just get by.
 
23 SEPTEMBER 2010 | GHAZNI PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN
 
Non-violent conflict resolution in local communities is essential for bringing peace and stability to Afghanistan.  In the recent history of this war-torn country, the most effective agents for advancing peace and security have been indigenous structures such as Shuras, Jirgas, and Maliks.  Maliks are key local power brokers who serve as arbiters in family and community conflict.
 
23 SEPTEMBER 2010 | AKHANDZADA VILLAGE, KANDAHAR PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN
 
Life in Akhandzada Village, located in Kandahar, has never been easy.  But when its ancient water source dried up, so did the local economy.
 
20 SEPTEMBER 2010 | KANDAHAR, AFGHANISTAN
 
It is not easy for journalists in Afghanistan’s south to travel to major cities for media training.  Stories abound of young journalists confronted at illegal checkpoints by Taliban and other anti-government groups, where the greatest fear is that a search will reveal their journalist’s card.  However, many journalists are willing to take the risk because they are committed to building a free press and an informed populace.
 
20 SEPTEMBER 2010 | KANDAHAR PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN
 
Each year, Abdul Kabir noticed his barley yield dropping from the year before.  When a friend told him about a new call-in radio program where he could talk about his problem with a government expert, the farmer in the Dand District of southern Afghanistan was skeptical.  He’d never heard of an agricultural extension agent, much less talked to one.
 
15 SEPTEMBER 2010 | NANGARHAR PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN
 
Long-standing land disputes spanning generations are common in Nangarhar Province. A jirgamar (elder) from Behsud recently recounted a decades-long dispute over a small piece of land situated between two area qwams (tribes). Just recently, an altercation among qwams reignited old arguments, leaving at least five people dead and 30 wounded near Jalalabad, the provincial capital of Nangarhar.
 
15 SEPTEMBER 2010 | KANDAHAR, AFGHANISTAN
 
In April 2010, a truck laden with explosives crashed into a guesthouse occupied by project staff supporting USAID in Kandahar City.  The ensuing explosion also threatened a program that is critically important to USAID’s Afghanistan Infrastructure and Rehabilitation Program (AIRP) and the effort to provide stable electricity to the people of Kandahar and surrounding areas.
 
15 SEPTEMBER 2010 | KABUL, AFGHANISTAN
 
Imagine trying to learn to use a computer with an English keyboard, having never seen the English alphabet.  Add to that the fact that you’ve never seen a computer in your life and you’re in middle age.  That’s the challenge for employees of the national electric company Da Afghanistan Breshna Sherkat (DABS) who work at hydro power stations in Afghanistan.  Many of them have worked at the same power station for more than 15 years.
 

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Last updated: April 28, 2014