Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

Before receiving support from a USAID project, employees in the Alexandria and Mansoura Courts of First Instance’s typing pool would receive from the judges handwritten decisions, which they would type on manual typewriters and have reviewed by the judges prior to signing. This laborious process slowed the adjudication of cases because errors meant documents required a complete retyping on antiquated equipment.

Farming families in the Mantaro valley of Peru’s central Junin region have been cultivating crops like potatoes and grains for centuries. So, when USAID suggested that some switch to a new crop, the farmers were curious to learn more. 

Agriculture is the way of life for many Andean communities, and the mountainous region of Ayacucho is no exception. Farmers there cultivate lands that depend mostly on rainfall for water. Yet in recent years, droughts have been occurring more frequently in the region, creating a demand for irrigation water. Moreover, since the farmers depend on rainfall, this usually limits them to cultivating just one crop each year, making it impossible for farmers to meet local demand for grains and produce.

USAID helped Aicacolor install the first bixin factory in Peru – one of the only five in the world. Aicacolor is a Peruvian enterprise dedicated to the production and commercialization of natural colors for the food industry with a focus on dairy products. Bixine and norbixine, natural colorants extracted from the annatto tree, are used to give color to processed products such as oil, cheese, margarine, mayonnaise, and yogurt.

Tomasa, a traditional midwife for the past seven years, lives in a small community called Villa Constitution near Caaguazu City in Paraguay. As a midwife, she has seen much joy which comes with birth but also many problems and trouble.

Not too long ago, the Paraguayan municipality of Ñemby was struggling to regulate businesses and property, collect taxes and repair infrastructure in a way that satisfied the needs of citizens. Located 10 miles south of Paraguay's capital Asuncion, Ñemby was facing a financial crisis like one suffered by a previous administration, which led to five months of unpaid salaries for public workers and more than $200,000 in debt.

Frustrated with the lack of transparency in local governance, as well as evident corruption among public officials, residents of Capitan Miranda, a town in Paraguay’s southern region of Itapúa, joined forces to create a local citizen watchdog called the “Zero Impunity” group.

In the heart of the heavily populated Mbocayaty neighborhood in Villa Elisa, in southwest Paraguay, an eight-meters-deep ditch had formed in the midst of a large, sandy quarry. The ditch had families worried — it had become an unsafe and unhealthy place. It had also become an unsanitary and improvised dump site for garbage. Stray animals, disease, and erosion posed risks to both nearby dwellings and the people who lived in the simple homes alongside the quarry.

In 2003, the municipality of Villarrica, Paraguay installed a custom-made, computerized income information system under the guidance of a USAID-funded project to improve municipal governance. The system standardized and integrated municipal records on properties, property owners, and tax collections.

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Last updated: August 11, 2014