Crisis to Confidence: Helping the Grieving

Representatives of civilian families torn apart by violence or unforeseen disasters collect the immediate assistance provided by
Representatives of civilian families torn apart by violence or unforeseen disasters collect the immediate assistance provided by USAID
USAID/ACAP II
USAID’s civilian assistance program has brought hope to 10,000 families in the last five years
22 MAY 2012 | NANGARHAR, AFGHANISTAN
 
Nine stricken families in the eastern province of Nangarhar received food and support in the initial aftermath of the suicide attack. Now, they will receive follow-on assistance tailored to their needs
 
When taxi driver Faridullah headed for Jalalabad airport in the hope of picking up passengers, his family was unaware they would never see him again. It was dawn and a vehicle packed with explosives was hurtling towards the same destination. The 28-year-old father-of-two died, along with five others, in the Taliban suicide attack. His devastated family was left to cope with the loss of a husband, father, brother and breadwinner. The taxi was the family’s only asset which they depended on to earn an income.
 
That’s when USAID’s civilian assistance project stepped in. Faridullah’s stricken family was offered food for the pantry and further help with planning for the future along with nine other families, which suffered in the attack. The Afghan Civilian Assistance Program, which has helped 10,000 families in the last five years, tailors its offers of help to the needs of the individual family. Some families may need vocational training, while others may need help with setting up a business.
 
Faridullah’s brother, Aref, said the assistance was a godsend. “Within two days of the incident, staff members attended the mourning ceremony with me. They shared my sorrows. This meant a lot to me. I received some food supplies which will help me feed my brother’s two sons who were orphaned by the explosion.”

Last updated: January 07, 2014

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