Building Tough Roads in Tough Places

USAID's Strategic Provincial Roads Project rehabilitates rural roads in Afghanistan and serves as the backbone for development c
USAID's Strategic Provincial Roads Project rehabilitates rural roads in Afghanistan and serves as the backbone for development corridors across the impoverished nation for some of the world's most deprived and isolated communities.
International Relief and Development SPR-SEA
27 JULY 2010 | KABUL, AFGHANISTAN
 
Decades of war, harsh living conditions, and neglect due to extreme poverty and instability have left the country’s infrastructure in rubble and decay.  Roads in many parts of the country have never existed due to its remoteness.  The lack of regional, provincial, and national conduits has had a significant impact on Afghanistan’s lagging development.
 
USAID’s Strategic Provincial Roads project in Southern and Eastern Afghanistan (SPR-SEA) is building high-quality roads in some of the world’s most inhospitable and hostile places.
 
USAID provides technical assistance, mentorship, and support to Afghan construction companies to ensure that Afghanistan‘s reconstruction is Afghan driven, Afghan led, and Afghan built.  As a result, an expanded and improved road network connecting provinces to the National Highway supports increased economic activity while enabling Afghans access to essential social services, such as health care and education.
 
Construction of non-asphalt durable roads has increased stability and security throughout the country.  Working closely with local leaders and stakeholders, the new roads have facilitated trade, improved access to goods and markets, and fostered interdependence between neighboring villages and communities.
 
USAID and the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan have made provincial roads a priority to pave the way for development across Afghanistan, not only connecting rural and remote communities, but connecting Afghanistan to the region and to the rest of the world.

Last updated: January 08, 2014

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