Binding Court Papers in a New Way

AFTER Now, USAID’s Formal Rule of Law Project has provided him the requisite skills and knowledge he needs to do the same task w
AFTER Now, USAID’s Formal Rule of Law Project has provided him the requisite skills and knowledge he needs to do the same task with greater speed and efficiency using mod-ern machinery.
USAID/RLS-Formal
How one simple machine makes all the difference for one man.
BEFORE Day in and day out, this spinsar used glue, strings, wires, and a hammer to bind publications announcing rule of law developments in Afghanistan.
9 APRIL 2012 | KABUL, AFGHANISTAN
 
For as long as anyone can remember, a ”spinsar”,  or old man,  went to work every day at the Afghanistan Supreme Court to manually bind pages of books and periodicals that announced progress and developments within the Supreme Court. Using only a hammer, string, wires, and glue, he meticulously assembled each item page by page. After thousands of hours of manual labor, the hand-bound publications were then sent out across Afghanistan to help spread news and information about the rule of law and the justice system. 
 
But thanks to USAID’s Formal Rule of Law project, this old man is no longer bound to antiquated tools, and is now armed with the skills, knowledge, and ability to use a new, up-to-date book binding machine. This seemingly simple solution has helped to improve the speed and efficiency of communication between the Court and the people it serves by making a process that once took weeks to be done in a matter of days.

Last updated: January 07, 2014

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