Afghanistan Resolves Decades-Old Tribal Conflict

Taimani Ha tribal leaders embrace after agreement on peace deal, December 2013.
Taimani Ha tribal leaders embrace after agreement on peace deal, December 2013.
USAID SIKA-West program
Eights days of talks yield peace treaty
“I am grateful to the government and the Tribal Conflict Resolution Committee, which helped resolved the conflict between our tribes.”

April 2014—The Ghori and the Qashqa, two sub-tribes of the Taimani Ha tribe in the Chaghcharan district of Afghanistan’s Ghor province, have been in violent conflict since 1984. The conflict began with the murders of prominent leaders from both sides, and an ongoing cycle of violent retaliations has led to countless more deaths, injuries and displacements of district residents.

While there have been sporadic calls for calm and lulls in the violence, the two sides could never manage to end the bloodletting and bring the conflict to a peaceful conclusion.

In June 2013, USAID helped the local Afghan government establish the Chaghcharan Tribal Conflict Resolution Committee and then trained its members to resolve conflicts. Made up of leading provincial government officials, tribal leaders and religious leaders, the committee was tasked with addressing long-running and destructive tribal conflicts in Chaghcharan.

The committee engaged Taimani Ha tribal leaders in December 2013. After eight days of moderated discussions, both sides accepted the authority of the provincial government and spelled out the abuses, damage and compensation that they felt needed to be addressed. Most importantly, they reaffirmed their shared desire for a just peace.

Under the committee’s guidance, the tribes agreed to a peace treaty with four requirements: They would immediately open all roads in the district, stop illegal taxation, keep armed members out of the other tribes’ territory, and allow the immediate return of all of those who had been displaced by the conflict.

“I am grateful to the government and the Tribal Conflict Resolution Committee, which helped resolved the conflict between our tribes,” said Ziaaadin*, leader of the Ghori tribe.

“We are happy that the conflict was resolved. During the past years, many people were killed and injured,” said Abdul Fazl Bashiri from the Qashqa tribe.

This government-led, negotiated peace will enable the Ghor provincial government to support further development efforts in the Chaghcharan district—efforts that would not have been possible prior to the agreement.

*Many Afghans use one name only.

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Last updated: July 21, 2014

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